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Biographical Profiles
Jane Berriman Jackson: The Life of an Eastern Shore Woman
By James Edward Jensen

Introduction

“The Eastern Shore records are the oldest continuous
records of English speaking America…worn with age,
mutilated and with many pages gone forever.”[1]

– Beverley Fleet



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Contents : Essays

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About these essays







Every scholar must be prepared to be left with unanswered questions when beginning research on any individual who lived on the Eastern Shore of Virginia during the early 17th century. It should also be noted that women rarely surface throughout these early records, and since not all of the original records have survived both manipulation and time, the search for evidence pertaining to the life of an Eastern Shore woman remains an ominous task. The majority of documents found in early colonial records center around issues concerning the male inhabitants simply because the men owned property, paid taxes and participated in civil office. Therefore, within a gender-centric society such as this, women most often appear within the context of their husbands’ legal affairs or are referred to within wills and inventories.

Within this biographical sketch of Jane Berryman the reader will not only discover the story of a resilient woman, but will also uncover interesting clues to what life was like in 17th century Virginia from a feminine perspective. Following her life from the earliest pertinent document, through her three consecutive marriages and lastly an analysis of her acquired material wealth, Jane’s story serves as an example of the opportunities some women had for upward mobility reflected through heightened social status.

The exact date of Jane Berryman’s arrival to, or birth in, the New World remains unknown, yet during the early 1600s this ambiguity represents the norm and not the exception. The first continuous extant court documents were written in Virginia’s Eastern Shore county of Accomack – Northampton and are found in a book of loose papers containing dates which span from 1632 to 1640.[2] Throughout this first volume of court records not a single reference is found pertaining to Jane. Luckily, through persistent searching one essential document is found to exist: the will of Alice Wilson – a woman who turned out to be none other than Jane’s mother.[3]

Jane’s Origins and First Husband

Within Alice Wilson’s will six names appear. The first two, namely John and Lynn, both appear at the edge of a tear, leaving the rest of their respective sentences incomplete.[4] Due to the deteriorated state of the record, the names of the remaining four beneficiaries are fortunately legible and include either last name, a designator or both. Alice Wilson’s will names her grandchild Frances Carsley, William Berryman, her daughter Mary and other daughter Jane Bessins.[5] Of the two daughters, Mary’s last name is not included, but is named as Alice’s sole Executrix, but Jane Bessins is given the use of Alice Wilson’s house and grounds provided that she remains a widow. Due to the deteriorated state of Alice’s will, one cannot determine whether William Berryman was a member of Alice’s family. Yet, through further research, three important discoveries were made: first, that William Berryman is a son from Alice Wilson’s previous marriage; second, that William Berryman is the brother of Jane Bessins; third, that Jane had three husbands in succession, namely marrying Thomas[6] Bessins, John Jackson and Richard Lemon.[7] Aside from the will of Alice Wilson and a passing mention found within a secondary source, no other information can be found concerning Jane Berryman’s first husband, Thomas Bessins, although one can be certain that he passed away prior to 1640 because Jane is referred to as a widow in her mother’s will.

Women were in high demand since there were so few in early colonial Virginia. In addition, since a husband would offer a woman a better social station and provide her with the opportunity for upward mobility, it becomes clear why Jane, like her mother, married more than once. However, the two most pressing questions remain still unanswered. When was Jane born? How did she find her way to Virginia’s Eastern Shore? Within the first volume of the county court records for Accomack – Northampton, Virginia, dating from 1632 – 1640, not one single reference is found mentioning either Jane Berryman, Jane Jackson, Jane Lemon or any of her husbands. However, Jane’s brother William Berryman shows up numerous times throughout the records and is even listed as being 32 years old on July 7, 1634.[8] Jane’s age is never stated in writing, although it would be safe to presume that both Jane and her brother were roughly the same age. Jane was a widow prior to 1640, as stated in her mother’s will; therefore, because it remains unlikely that she became a wife, then widow, before reaching the age of majority she was probably born before 1624 – although no date has yet been referenced when Alice Wilson first had her will written. In addition, since William Berryman was born around 1602, it is likely that his sister Jane too was born near the turn of the 17th century.

One document does discuss Jane’s brother William, which states, “William Berriman petitioned at this court for 250 acres of land upon the old plantation Creeke bounding upon the land of Henry Carslys called by the name of the fishing point necke...”[9] This document, dated to April 13, 1635, reveals an ambitious young man who is attempting to gain land on the Eastern Shore adjacent to that of Henry Carsley. The oldest settlement in Northampton County dates to June 1614.[10] As noted in his mother’s will, William Berryman had family connections to the Carsley family prior to 1640. Perhaps William wanted land on the Eastern Shore to be nearer to his mother, but where was his sister, the widow Jane, at this time?

Jane on the Eastern Shore: Husband Number Two

The initial search for John Jackson turned up four possible dates for his arrival in North America on the western shore of Virginia. The first reference listed John Jackson as a servant, who at an unknown age arrived on the ship called the Abigail.[11] The second had a John Jackson who by May 12, 1624, was buried.[12] The third revealed that in the area of Martins Hundred there lived a John Jackson, with a wife Ann, a child aged twenty weeks and a daughter who died in 1624, all of whom arrived on a ship called the Warwick.[13] Finally, the fourth mentioned a John Jackson and John, aged nine years, who came to James City.[14] Therefore, it seems most likely that John Jackson the servant and Jane’s second husband are one in the same. This conclusion is based on the fact that, of the remaining three John Jacksons, one had passed away and the remaining two had sons who would not have been of the correct age in 1624/5, since Jane’s son Jonas is referred to as an orphan in 1650.[15] This suggests that by 1650 Jonas was a minor and therefore born between 1630 and 1643.

As the search for Jane continued, through a close examination of the early records of Northampton County, one surprising entry came to light. This document was a certificate granted to William Berryman in 1643 for the transportation of ten individuals to Northampton, Virginia. Among those listed were Robert Jackson, Jane Jackson and Jonas Jackson.[16] As previously mentioned, Jane had married John Jackson and from this union produced one child: Jonas Jackson.[17] Therefore, since there is no further mention of Robert Jackson in Northampton County, or the greater area, this name could easily be explained as a clerical error. This would mean that John, Jane and Jonas Jackson landed on the Eastern shore in 1643; where Jane would be reunited with her immediate family. Unfortunately for John this union was short lived, since later that same year the court records refer to Jane Jackson as a widow.

Three documents dating between 1643 and 1645 mention the widow Jane Jackson. First, due to court order, Alexander Mountney is instructed to present himself at the home of John Dennis in order to satisfy a debt owed to “Jane Jackson Widdy”[18] in the amount of 326 pounds of tobacco. Second, found within the Will of William Burdette, dated to July 22, 1643, the deceased has bequeathed unto his “loveing friend, Jane Jackson three pounds sterling money to bee bestowed on a ring which (he) desires her to weare for a remembrance of (him).”[19] Third, a reference is found that mentions Alice, the late relict [widow] of William Burdette deceased, as owing Jane Jackson, widow, 900 pounds of tobacco.[20] Therefore, from these court excerpts the reader discovers that not only is John Jackson deceased, but also that Jane Jackson was a dear friend of William Burdette; which strengthens the notion that Jane certainly had interacted with the Burdette family, among others, prior to her arrival mentioned in William Berryman’s certificate for the transportation of newcomers.

Whereas the information on Jane’s first husband remains somewhat ambiguous, her second husband, John Jackson, does have an inventory which details his earthly possessions and wealth.[21] From his inventory a window into the past is opened, one which enables the reader to create a picture of John Jackson and of the type of life an early settler would have led. Clearly he did not have an abundance of possessions. At this time Virginia was still a frontier environment. His inventory written on the August 27, 1647, lists: one cow, a young heifer, a young sow with five small pigs, a gun, a knife with a sheath, one “faire” suit of clothes, some old apparel, a Dutch hat, some tools, a yard or two of ribbon and some provisions consisting of salted fish and corn. Although this list seems short, John Jackson was apparently able to support his family and owned livestock which would have placed him among the middle class inhabitants of the Eastern Shore. As a property owner he was making the move upward. Perhaps John Jackson farmed a piece of land that he rented from another or perhaps he was too ill when his family moved to the Eastern Shore; perhaps this mystery will never be solved. Nonetheless he passed away soon after his arrival in Northampton. His demise is not unusual for this place and time. Newcomers to Virginia often died at a young age, either due to poor living conditions or the “seasoning”, which refers to the first two years that a new arrival spent in North America during which their bodies had to adjust to sudden changes in climate, nourishment and exposure to disease and unhygienic surroundings. The first pertinent document relating to Jackson’s death, referencing a date of April 28, 1643, cites Jane Jackson, widow, as making a declaration of a gift to her son Jonas Jackson.[22] Next, a document dated to 1649 entitles Henry Walker to a commission of administration upon the estate of John Jackson, deceased.[23] Combined with the previously mentioned Inventory of John Jackson, which dates to the end of August 1647, one can see that an inventory was not always done during the same year as the death.

Jane Lemon: Husband Number Three

Following John Jackson’s death, life for Jane must have continued much as it had before, the only major change being her marriage to Richard Lemon, who was a practicing attorney and prominent individual on the Eastern Shore. A court document, dated 1645, names both Richard Lemon and Thomas Johnson as administrators for the estate of William Berryman, deceased.[24] This would suggest that Richard Lemon lived close to William Berryman and that Jane most likely met her third husband due to this proximity.

In a document found in the court proceedings of a court session in Northampton on January 28, 1645, Obedience Robins gave a deposition in open court pertaining to the marriage of Jane Jackson and Richard Lemon; which states:

“This deponent saith that before Mr. Rich Lemon did intermarry with Jane Jackson widd this deponent called the sd Mr. Rich: Lemon into the house and told the sd Lemon saying the widd hath and did intend to make ovr hir Cattle unto Jones Jackson hir sonn and there shee hath a servant that shee hadd of mee and you shall give the child a man- servant for him And the sd Lemon answered saying I will in Lew of that man for seven yeares soe soon As I am marryed And further not.”[25]

However, it was not long before Jane Lemon was once again a widow. A court order dating January 6, 1645, names Richard Lemon as deceased.[26] Jane Lemon would appear to have been married for no more than two years and nine months.[27] The last known court entry mentioning Richard Lemon as alive dates to 1645 where he is once again named along with Thomas Johnson as administrators, but this time concerning a court order for these two men to pay unto the estate of John Major 300 pounds of tobacco in cask – presumably to pay a debt incurred by the late William Berryman.[28]

In the records, two references have been found which discuss the location of Richard Lemon’s home. First, only a passing reference is made, which states that on February 25, 1645, Martin Kirke provided a deposition in open court attesting to having witnessed John Stringer, a surgeon, who “brought an account of Sr. Edmond Plowden to the house of Rich: Lemon deceased where the sd Plowden then was...”[29] This first document discusses an event that took place fourteen months earlier; likely placing Sir Edmond Plowden as a guest at the home of Richard Lemon, then alive. Second, found within a court order, Captain William Stone, the attorney to Captain Richard Ingle, while engaged in a dispute between his client and the deceased Richard Lemon’s estate was ordered to “bee att Mistress Lemons howse att Cherriston Creeke.”[30] With Cherrystone Creek lying just to the north of Old Plantation Creek, one can appreciate how close most residents of Virginia’s lower Eastern Shore were from one another. Further, since the inhabitants used waterways to facilitate travel, it becomes easy to understand how Jane would have been in contact with Richard Lemon – who then only resided two creeks above from her brother’s land.[31] In addition, while living within such closeness to the waterways, it is no wonder that Richard Lemon would dabble in exports, as found in a court document which states:

“by the Oathes of John Webster, and Peeter Varloe that John Pannewel did bargaine and sell unto Richard Lemmon Eight hundred pounds of tobacco at seaven pence per pound to bee delivered at London. Lemmon did give unto the sayd Pannewell twelve pence in part of satisfaction for the sayd quantity of tobacco.”[32]

Needless to say, the court ordered Pannewell to trade with Richard Lemon as previously agreed. However, it is not surprising that Richard Lemon would be so successful in court affairs, since he was knowledgeable of the law having been both a practicing attorney and a member of numerous juries. In two separate documents Richard Lemon is mentioned within the context of performing the duties of an attorney. First, within a memorandum, Richard Lemon “engaged himselfe to the Board that Henry Lilly shall make his personall appearance before his Majesties Commissioners at the next Countye court houlden at Northampton.”[33] Second, in another court document which states:

“Whereas William Berryman was arrested to this Present Court to answeare the suit of Christopher Dickson, And forasmuch as Mr. Richard Lemmon the lawfull Attorney of the said Berryman Craveth a Reference to the next County Court for the difference depending. It is therefore thought Fitt that the said William Berryman or his lawfull Attourney shall make his appeareance at the next County Court there to stand to a trial of final determination.”[34]

Further, Richard Lemon is listed five times throughout the records as having sat in court as a member of the jury[35] and four times as having provided testimony in the form of a deposition taken in open court[36]. While examining the aforementioned documents, one important piece of evidence was found – a signature. The fact that Richard Lemon signed his name and did not simply use a mark is proof that he was literate. Literacy in the early 17th century was not exactly a rarity, but most people who worked outside of public office and court affairs had no real necessity for reading and writing, with the exception of Bible readings. Within these depositions, whether acting as an attorney or simply a gentleman, Richard Lemon would stand up for his friends and support their claims in court- such as in the case of “Luke Stubbins Merchant [who] hath defamed John Stringer Carpenter in calling him Cheateing Fellow”[37]; or simply to attest to having witnessed a passive event, such as the document Richard Lemon signed where “William Scott of the Cittie of London Marriner have made constituted and Authorized [his] true and loveing Friend Ambrose Dixon in the Countye of Northampton Shipp Carpenter to bee my true and lawfull Attourney.”[38] Therefore, throughout the early court records, Richard Lemon would appear to be a trusted and respected individual.

Following his multiple court appearances serving as legal counsel, juror or witness between the years 1645 and 1651, Richard Lemon is mentioned fifteen times as owing debts to others.[39] In addition, once deceased, four men are named by the court to appraise his estate- William Munns, Mr. Stringer, John Webster and Francis Petitt.[40] Richard Lemon seems to have enjoyed an active life in court affairs and involved himself in money-generating ventures such as the trade of tobacco with England. Perhaps Jane was attracted to him because of his social station and wealth or maybe simply because he was the most eligible bachelor in the area of Old Plantation Creek – one may never know.

Although the exact circumstances surrounding the death of Richard Lemon are unknown, the court records do mention one important clue to his state of health towards the end of his life. In one of the fifteen documents listing the accounts of the deceased Richard Lemon, one listed an amount of 1070 pounds of tobacco that was owed to Obedience Robins for two servants’ wages and for sugar “in the time of his sickness.”[41] Since the above-mentioned debt was of a substantial amount, perhaps Richard Lemon suffered from an illness for quite some time.

Jane: A Widow Once More

An examination of the life of her third and last husband, Richard Lemon, demonstrates how Jane bettered her social station. His inventory and personal accounts reveal much of this social transformation in the few years between 1643 and 1649. Found in the court records, oddly enough following John Jackson’s inventory, are both the inventory and account of Richard Lemon, dated August 25, 1646, and September 4, 1647, respectively.[42] In both the inventory and account of Richard Lemon, Jane is named as both the widow and administratrix of his estate. Richard Lemon’s account itemizes in detail 14,825 pounds of tobacco which was distributed for the payment of his funeral expenses including a dinner, his coffin and the future maintenance of his grave. He also provided for the payment of tithes, taxes and levies. Finally, the remainder was distributed to 18 individuals to whom he owed payments. From this detailed account, perhaps the most striking find is the sheer display of wealth expressed through the lavish funeral festivities and grave. Then, from his inventory, appraised at 14,077 pounds of tobacco, his estate reveals livestock, crops due to his estate from five men, furniture, guns, tools, books, a small boat, the use of a house and plantation for one year as well as several debts owed to his estate from accounts and bills. Richard Lemon’s inventory does fall shy of covering his debts by nearly 800 pounds of tobacco, yet John Jackson’s inventory, which directly precedes the inventory and account of Richard Lemon, totaled roughly 1500 pounds of tobacco – this may have assisted Jane in managing the estate of Richard Lemon, deceased.

The next record for Jane Jackson is a record dating to May 1649, which refers to George Clarke and John Badham as “the overseers of the estate of Jane Lemon, deceased.”[43] However, aside from the obvious importance of this document, which first references Jane as having passed away, it also states that Jonah Jackson, her son and heir, is to be given the use and benefit of twenty-five cows “with calves or calves at their sides” after the expiration of seven years.[44] In addition, from a court order found within the court records, the estate of Jane Lemon, deceased, is ordered to pay Mr. Stringer “Philomed” 450 pounds of tobacco for “Phisicke” she received.[45] Therefore, Jane must have been ill and died of some ailment. Following this discovery, one question arises. What was life like for Jane after the death of her last husband, before she too passed away?

Based on the extensive debts she incurred due to the passing of Richard Lemon, life for Jane must have been stressful to say the least; yet she must have remained competent in the eyes of her friends and family, since she was placed in charge of her niece Anne Carsley.[46] As previously mentioned, Jane had family connections tying her to the Carsley line, as seen in her mother’s will.[47] However, returning to the subject of her debts, Jane’s account is found within the records and lists numerous quantities of fabric, thread, shoes, soap, three axes, two dozen Irish stockings and twelve pounds of powder in small barrels – totaling 4,332 pounds of tobacco.[48] Although nothing is known about what Jane did from day to day, one could presume from the items listed above that she sewed and enjoyed small luxuries. In addition, Jane appears in court, representing the estate of Richard Lemon, to acknowledge a debt owed to Colonel Nathaniel Littleton[49] and once more in connection with a debt owed to Richard Ingle, mariner[50]. Aside from these documented events, nothing else is known about her life following the death of Richard Lemon.

Throughout the records, other debts arise belonging to the estate of Jane Lemon, deceased. In total, seven documents discuss debts and specific amounts owed to others from her estate. These debts stem from payments due for the appraisal of her estate, for livestock payments due to the guardian of Jonas Jackson, for the transfer of the orphan Anne Carsley’s goods following her death while in the guardianship of Jane; and lastly, all remaining debts owed from the estate of Jane Lemon whether incurred by Jane directly or through the settling of Richard Lemon’s accounts.[51]

Despite the troubles of having to repay past debts, Jane’s estate also collected several debts owed to her as well. Beginning with her family and relatives, Jane received three payments. First, from the estate of Anne Carsley, deceased, the court ordered that Jane’s estate at Old Plantation Creek was to receive 400 pounds of tobacco, which was detailed as pertaining to a coffin and other funeral expenses incurred for the orphan Anne while in the custody of Jane Lemon.[52] Second, from the administrators of the estate of her brother, William Berryman, Jane’s estate was to receive through court order, 4065 pounds of tobacco.[53] Third, from her late husband Richard Lemon’s estate, Jane was to receive what was due her out of the said estate.[54] From her friend William Burdette’s estate, Jane was to receive three pounds sterling as a legacy via the administrators of his affairs.[55] In addition, two more payments were to be received by Jane’s estate from debts owed to her from Mistress Jane Taylor and John Chuwell, totaling 300 pounds of tobacco and a further 170 pounds of tobacco, respectively.[56] Within the court records there were two final items listed as being owed to the estate of Jane Lemon; first, that a certificate of her “Quietus est”[57] was to be given to her following her payment of a debt to John Coghan in the amount of 1,000 pounds of tobacco;[58] and second, that her estate was to receive a payment of 14,000 pounds of tobacco from George Smith, Thomas Leatherberry and William Starling for the use of the estate[59] – due in one entire payment to be received at the Old Plantation Creek. Following this seemingly hectic period yet another series of questions arise. What did Jane Lemon accomplish in her life? What did Jane Lemon’s accumulated material wealth amount to? What happened to her son Jonas?

The Final Chapter in the Life of Jane

The life of Jane (Berryman Bessins Jackson) Lemon represents a microcosm of society. On May 30, 1649, her inventory was entered into the court records. Originally written on March 30, 1649, her estate was appraised by Anthony Hoskins, George Clarke, Jonathan Giles and George Smyth.[60] Surprisingly, this remarkable woman has no surviving will; most likely her will was lost in the court process, since references are made to its existence in other records.[61]

Within Jane Lemon’s inventory one will find an accumulated wealth which overshadows many of her contemporaries. Listed within her itemized inventory are over 100 cooking and eating accessories, ten pieces of furniture, five garments, over thirty tools, more than fifty bedding and linen items, at least 22 books, no less than eleven animals and an assortment of both provisions and odds-and-ends. The pure volume of items contained within this inventory tells the tale of a woman who could furnish a large home as well as one who enjoyed the comfort of luxuries, such as pewter pieces, a fifty-four pound cotton bed and a new pair of Holland sheets. Her inventory also listed a few items not normally associated with women, such as two guns and a hand sword. However, this frontier environment necessitated weapons to assist in hunting, but most likely to offer protection from potential attacks. The fact that Jane owned a large quantity of books would suggest that she was somewhat educated and could both read and write; the only document that proves that she was literate is her signature on the account of Richard Lemon.[62] In addition, with no mention of servants within this inventory and considering the large number of cooking items, not to mention two butter churns, Jane must have done her fair share of physical work when home, which only further suggests that she was both mentally and physically strong. Therefore, from the evidence of this woman’s eventful life, including travel by ship, surviving three marriages and having a child, Jane Lemon can truly be seen as a resilient woman. Her family ties and friendships have proven beneficial to her as well as her son, but Jane’s strength of character was perhaps her best attribute and helped propel her to achieve her respected social station.[63]

Jonas Jackson: Her Son and Heir

Following the death of his mother, Jane Lemon, Jonas Jackson’s estate was placed in the hands of supervisors, one of them being Major Peter Walker. [64] Life for the young orphan was not without complications as seen through the numerous times his estate was handled through the court. A court document dated January 20, 1651, Henry White is shown as having “hired of Thomas Leatherbery part of the house and land formerly belonging unto Mrs. Lemon,” which “by her bequeathed in her last will and testament to her son Jonas Jackson.”[65] Apparently Henry White “hath altogether failed and is delinquent in the performance of the condition,” therefore he was ordered to pay 300 pounds of tobacco to Thomas Leatherbery.[66] There was also the affair of the cows, where the court ordered that Jonas was to receive livestock via Peter Walker and the rest of the overseers of the estate of Jane Lemon from the hands of John Badham and the administrator of George Clarke, deceased.[67] Albeit, Jonas was to receive 200 pounds that was put aside for him from the estate of Richard Lemon, he was also to receive 426 pounds of tobacco indirectly from Jane Lemon, a gift of a heifer of a year-and-a-half from John Little and the cattle and man servant mentioned in the previously discussed deposition of Obedience Robins.[68]

Despite the loss of both his father and mother, Jonas Jackson was fortunate enough to be left with material wealth, land and a strong family history. In addition, Jonas was not left without family relatives since Jonathan Gills, his uncle[69], lived at least until 1664. Apparently his uncle favored the young Jonas and within his will written on December 6, 1664, bequeathed unto Jonas his gun and a pair of French falls.[70] Jonas Jackson may have been manipulated through the court system, since one document references a John Tilney who asked the court to approve the exchange of his 300 acres at “Occhannoke Creeke” for 300 acres belonging to the orphan Jonas Jackson – unfortunately it remains difficult to judge the quality of each plot of land today, nearly 400 years later.[71] Before 1666 Jonas also acquired land in two places- first, near Occahamock Creek; and second, near the Little Matomkin Creek in the area of Watcheprege.[72] Through engaging in entrepreneurial adventures, such as the combined efforts of Edward Revell and himself in transporting twenty individuals, Jonas came to acquire land as well as the opportunity to improve his financial situation and provide for his children in the way that Jane provided for him.[73]

In conclusion, through a detailed examination of the court records, the life of a woman on Virginia’s Eastern Shore can begin to unfold. Unfortunately, the existing documents do not reveal every detail of her life, but the fact that these early records are continuous enables the known events of her life to be placed in chronological order. In addition, through a careful reading of the early court records of Northampton County, researchers can begin to piece together Jane’s past. Perhaps in the near future, additional documents will resurface to help fill in the missing pages of Jane’s life.

Family chart





Footnotes:

(The reference number located between parentheses is only applicable to the microfilm shelves of The Edward H. Nabb Research Center for Delmarva History and Culture.)




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1 Fleet, Beverley. Virginia: Colonial Abstracts, Vol. I, Maryland: Baltimore, Genealogical Publishing Co. Inc., 1988, page 3.

2 Specifically referring to Record Book, 1632 – 1640, Accomack – Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 1, Edward H. Nabb Research Center for Delmarva History and Culture, Salisbury University, Salisbury, Maryland. The original two counties located on Virginia’s Eastern-Shore were named Northampton and Accomack, where the latter bordered the province of Maryland to the north. See appendix G for a map of the Eastern Shore of Virginia, courtesy of the Edward H. Nabb Research Center for Delmarva History and Culture, drawn by Anne C. Wilkins, Eastville, Virginia, 1939, accession number 2000.02.10.03, which contains the names of the counties and creeks referred to within this biographical sketch. It should be noted that the two aforementioned counties were known collectively as Accawmack from 1632 to 1643, as Northampton from 1643 to 1663 and lastly as Northampton and Accomack after 1663.

3 Alice Wilson, Will, 1640 – 1645, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia. Microfilm Reel# 2, folio 11, Edward H. Nabb Research Center for Delmarva History and Culture, Salisbury University, Salisbury, Maryland. It should be noted that the will is missing the top right corner, thereby leaving the document with no known date for the document’s creation, yet it was entered into the records no later than 1640. See appendix A, James Edward Jensen, trans., 2004.

4 Both references appear as “name of John” and “the name of Lynn.” Since all other references to named individuals are not preceded by “name of” and with no other individual of that period found with the first name Lynn, it can be presumed that they refer to places. In Noel Currer-Briggs work, Virginia Settlers and English Adventurers: Abstracts of Wills, 1484-1798, and Legal Proceedings, 1560-1700, Relating to Early Virginia Families, Maryland: Baltimore, Genealogical Publishing Company, 1970, two references are found for Lynn Heaven, which remains the only place in Virginia to begin with the name Lynn during colonial times. Other places with the name Lynn were East Lynn, West Lynn and King’s Lynn – all on Virginia’s Western Shore near present-day Norfolk. First, on page 382, under the name Richard Waters, a reference to Lynn Heaven in Norfolk is found, which dates to the 11th of February, 1640/41. Second, on page 462, under the Bill of Complaint of Walter Kirby, a reference dating to 1639 mentions, “Tuesday Market place extending from Wollmarket street to the south as far as the Great River, or Port, called Lynn Heaven.” Perhaps this places Alice Wilson’s original residence on Virginia’s Western Shore if she was in fact associated with this old port town of Lynn Heaven.

5 Jane’s name in Alice Wilson’s will is the subject of some controversy. In the transcription located in appendix A, her name is found to be written as Joanne Jane Bessins where the “Jane” alone appears in superscript, perhaps indicating that the clerk of the court who originally copied the will into the records first wrote Joanne in error. Susie M. Ames, in her transcription of the same document, states that the will only contains the name Jane with no last name, found in Ames, Susie M. (Ed.). County Court Records of Accomack – Northampton, Virginia (1640 – 1645). Virginia: Charlottesville, The University of Virginia Press, 1940, page 18. Finally, in Meyer, et al. Adventures in Purse and Person Virginia 1607 – 1624/25, 3rd Edition, Virginia: Richmond, The Dietz Press Inc., 1987, page 163, the Will of Alice Wilson is shown as referencing Jane Bessins.

6 Although no documents mention the name of Jane Bessins’ husband, two interesting citations are found in George C. Greer’s work, Early Immigrants: 1623-1666. Maryland: Baltimore, Genealogical Publishing Co. Inc., 1982, page 32. The first entry listed a Thomas Beson, who in 1638 had his transportation claimed by Robert Freeman, James City Co.; the second entry listed a Thomas Besson, who in 1640 had his transportation claimed by Thomas Stegg, Charles City Co. As phonetic variants of Bessins, both men are likely the same and equally likely Jane’s first husband.

7 Meyer, et al. Adventures in Purse and Person Virginia 1607 – 1624/25, page 163.

8 William Berryman, Order, 1632 – 1640, Accomack – Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 1, page 33.

9 William Berryman, Order, 1632 – 1640, Accomack – Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 1, page 50.

10 Whitelaw, Ralph T. Virginia’s Eastern Shore: A History of Northampton and Accomack Counties. Virginia: Richmond, Virginia Historical Society, 1951, Vol. I: 49 and 53. Page 49 references Virginia Historical Register as the source for the oldest settlement on Virginia’s Eastern Shore and page 53 references Old Plantation Creek as the oldest settlement’s name; although the latter is still debated today.

11 Meyer, et al. Adventures in Purse and Person Virginia 1607 – 1624/25, page 36 contained this entry as part of a census done on February 4, 1624/25.

12 Meyer, et al. Adventures in Purse and Person Virginia 1607 – 1624/25, page 63.

13 Meyer, et al. Adventures in Purse and Person Virginia 1607 – 1624/25, page 46.

14 Meyer, et al. Adventures in Purse and Person Virginia 1607 – 1624/25, page 32. Here it should also be noted that Jonas was a variation of the name John, as found in Barbra Evans’ work entitled, A to Zax: A Comprehensive Dictionary for Genealogists & Historians. Virginia: Alexandria, Hearthside Press, 1995, page 292.

15 Jonas Jackson, Order, 1645 – 1651, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia. Microfilm Reel# 3, folio 231, Edward H. Nabb Research Center for Delmarva History and Culture, Salisbury University, Salisbury, Maryland.

16 William Berryman, Order, 1640 – 1645, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 2, folio 126. In addition, the other seven names listed therein were as follows: Thomas Stanton, Millicent Cole, Arthur Emerson, Edmund Price, Abraham Kelly, John Freharne and William Povie.

17 Meyer, et al. Adventures in Purse and Person Virginia 1607 – 1624/25, page 163. See subsection entitled Jane’s Origins and First Husband.

18 Mr. Alexander Mountney, Order, 1640 – 1645, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 2, folio 142.

19 William Burdette, Will, 1640 – 1645, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 2, folio 159.

20 Alice Burdette, Order, 1640 – 1645, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 2, folio 191.

21 John Jackson, Inventory, 1645 – 1651, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia. Microfilm Reel# 3, folio 89 and page 90. See appendix B, James Edward Jensen, trans., 2004.

22 Jane Jackson, Order, 1640 – 1645, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 2, folio 198; see also Marshall, James H. (Ed.). Abstracts of the Wills and Administrations of Northampton County, Virginia: 1632 – 1802, Maine: Rockport, Picton Press, 2000, page 13.

23 Henry Walker, Order, 1645 – 1651, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 3, page 169.

24 Richard Lemon, Order, 1640 – 1645, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 2, page 234.

25 Obedience Robins, Order, 1645 – 1651, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 3, folio 12. It should be noted that January 28, 1645, reflects the old calendar system that used the end of March as the last day of each year. Hence, this deposition would have taken place early in 1646 and not 1645.

26 Administratrix of Richard Lemon, Order, 1645 – 1651, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 3, page 6.

27 This period of two years and nine months is the length of time between the earliest mention of John Jackson as deceased and the earliest mention of Richard Lemon as deceased: April 28, 1643, and January 6, 1645/6, respectively.

28 Richard Lemon, Order, 1640 – 1645, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 2, page 235 and folio 235.

29 Martin Kirke, Order, 1645 – 1651, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 3, folio 19.

30 Captain William Stone, Order, 1645 – 1651, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 3, folio 55. For another reference to the same court case see Richard Lemon, Order, 1640 – 1645, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 2, folio 217 and page 217.

31 See appendix G for a map that details the creeks in question.

32 John Pannewell, Order, 1640 – 1645, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 2, page 69.

33 Richard Lemon, Order, 1640 – 1645, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 2, page 196.

34 William Berryman, Order, 1640 – 1645, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 2, page 202.

35 Richard Lemon appears five times as a member of the jury, see the following references for each consecutive instance. Richard Lemon, Order, 1640 – 1645, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 2, folio 147 and page 148. Richard Lemon, Order, 1640 – 1645, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 2, page 156, which is dated to July 5, 1643, also mentions William Berryman on the same jury list. Richard Lemon, Order, 1640 – 1645, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 2, folio 197. Richard Lemon, Order, 1640 – 1645, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 2, folio 236. Richard Lemon, Order, 1640 – 1645, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 2, folio 237 (originally folio 238) and is dated to July 28, 1645..

36 Richard Lemon appears four times providing testimony in the for of a deposition, see following references. Richard Lemon, Order, 1640 – 1645, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 2, folio 85 and page 85. Richard Lemon, Order, 1640 – 1645, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 2, folio 144. Richard Lemon, Order, 1640 – 1645, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 2, folio 175. Richard Lemon, Order, 1640 – 1645, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 2, folio 199.

37 Richard Lemon, Order, 1640 – 1645, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 2, folio 85.

38 Richard Lemon, Order, 1640 – 1645, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 2, folio 175.

39 Richard Lemon is noted fifteen times throughout the records dating from 1645 to 1651 as owing others, see the following references. William Stevens, Order, 1645 – 1651, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 3, folio 19. Nathaniel Duncan, Order, 1645 – 1651, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 3, page 20. John Savage, Order, 1645 – 1651, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 3, folio 20. John Stringer, Order, 1645 – 1651, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 3, folio 7. Captain Richard Ingle, Order, 1645 – 1651, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 3, folio 30. William Stevens, Order, 1645 – 1651, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 3, folio 30. Mr. Obedience Robins, Order, 1645 – 1651, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 3, page 12. John Cogan, Order, 1645 – 1651, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 3, page 12. Captain William Stone, Order, 1645 – 1651, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 3, page 12. Anthony Hodgkins, Order, 1645 – 1651, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 3, page 7. Thomas Evans, Order, 1645 – 1651, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 3, page 12. Richard Ingle, Order, 1645 – 1651, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 3, page 6. John Pannewell, Order, 1645 – 1651, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 3, folio 12. John Charles, Order, 1645 – 1651, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 3, page 18. John Delongo, Order, 1645 – 1651, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 3, page 6.

40 Richard Lemon, deceased, Order, 1645 – 1651, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 3, page 29.

41 Mr. Obedience Robins, Order, 1645 – 1651, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 3, page 12.

42 Richard Lemon, Account, 1645 – 1651, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 3, page 90 and folio 90. Richard Lemon, Inventory, 1645 – 1651, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 3, folio 90 and page 91. See appendix C for his account, James Edward Jensen, trans., 2004. Also, see appendix D for his inventory, James Edward Jensen, trans., 2004.

43 George Clarke and John Badham, Bond, 1645 – 1651, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 3, page 141, which is the bond of those administering the estate of Jane Lemon. See appendix E, James Edward Jensen, trans., 2004.

44 George Clarke and John Badham, Bond, 1645 – 1651, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 3, page 141.

45 Mr. John Stringer, Order, 1645 – 1651, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 3, folio 177.

46 Anne Carsley, Account, 1645 – 1651, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 3, page 47, which itemizes the account of the cattle of Anne Carsley whom is referred to as the orphan in the hands of Mris. Jane Lemon, dated of July 10, 1646.

47 See subsection entitled, Jane’s Origins and First Husband, for the details of her mother’s Will. See also appendix A, James Edward Jensen, trans., 2004.

48 Jane Lemon, Account, 1645 – 1651, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 3, folio 33.

49 Colonel Nathaniel Littleton, Order, 1645 – 1651, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 3, folio 55, witch mentions both Mris. Jane Lemon and Henry Lilly as acknowledging a debt.

50 Richard Ingle, Order, 1645 – 1651, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 3, page 46.

51 For these debts which remained unsatisfied after Jane’s death see the following references. John Dickeson, Order, 1645 – 1651, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 3, page 202. Mr. Thomas Johnson, Order, 1645 – 1651, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 3, folio 176. Edmund Mathews, Order, 1645 – 1651, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 3, folio 190. Mr. John Stringer, Order, 1645 – 1651, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 3, folio 177. Frances Carsley, Order, 1645 – 1651, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 3, folio 177. Mris. Lemon, Order, 1645 – 1651, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 3, folio 146. Lt. Col. Argoll Yardley Esq., Order, 1651 – 1654, Northampton County Courthouse, Northampton, Virginia. Microfilm Reel# 3, page 56, Edward H. Nabb Research center for Delmarva History and Culture, Salisbury University, Salisbury, Maryland. Lt. William Waters, Order, 1651 – 1654, Northampton County Courthouse, Northampton, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 3, folio 57.

52 Anne Carsley, Order, 1645 – 1651, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 3, folio 135. It should be noted that the detailed breakdown of 400 pounds of tobacco, as payment owed, is written in the right margin.

53 William Berryman, Order, 1645 – 1651, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 3, folio 7.

54 Richard Lemon, Order, 1645 – 1651, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 3, page 7.

55 William Burdette, Order, 1645 – 1651, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 3, page 2.

56 Mris. Jane Taylor, order, 1645 – 1651, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 3, page 44. John Chuwell, Order, 1645 – 1651, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 3, folio 45.

57 Mris. Jane Lemon, Order, 1645 – 1651, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 3, page 113. The Latin term Quietus est refers specifically to an official discharge of an individual’s account.

58 John Coghan, Order, 1645 – 1651, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 3, folio 115.

59 Mris. Jane Lemon, Order, 1645 – 1651, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 3, folio 162. Here it should be noted that Jane Lemon’s name is spelt Joane Lemmon.

60 Jane Lemon, Inventory, 1645 – 1651, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 3, page 141 to 142. See appendix F, James Edward Jensen, trans., 2004. As per the oath they swore before Captain William Roper.

61 See subsection entitled: Jonas Jackson: Her Son and Heir, first paragraph.

62 Richard Lemon, Account, 1645 – 1651, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 3, page 90 and folio 90. See also appendix C, James Edward Jensen, trans., 2004.

63 Perry, James R. The Formation of a Society on Virginia’s Eastern Shore: 1615 – 1655. North Carolina: Chapel Hill, University of North Carolina Press, 1990. Within this work the author mentions Obedience Robins, William Berryman and William Burdette as among the original eight landowners in Northampton County.

64 Jonas Jackson, order, 1651 – 1654, Northampton County Courthouse, Northampton, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 3, page 155.

65 Henry White, Order, 1651 – 1654, Northampton County Courthouse, Northampton, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 3, page 76.

66 Henry White, Order, 1651 – 1654, Northampton County Courthouse, Northampton, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 3, page 76.

67 Jonas Jackson, Order, 1645 – 1651, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 3, page 231.

68 The three references for the above mentioned allotments to be made over to Jonas Jackson are as follows. Mr. Steven Charlton, Order, 1645 – 1651, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 3, page 12. Thomas Bushroade, Order, 1645 – 1651, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 3, folio 13. John Little, Order, 1645 – 1651, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 3, page 81. Mr. Obedience Robins, 1645 – 1651, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 3, folio 12.

69 Jonas Jackson, order, 1651 – 1654, Northampton County Courthouse, Northampton, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 3, page 155. It mentions that cattle were to be delivered unto the overseers of Jonas’ estate which were in the custody of Lt. Waters and that “Mr. Waters hath paid one cow unto Jonathan Gills, (uncle of the said orphant) in part of satisfaction for one steer and yearling heffer (which the said mr. Clarke made use of).”

70 Marshall, James H. (Ed.). Abstracts of the Wills and Administrations of Northampton County, Virginia: 1632 – 1802, page 74.

71 John Tilney, Order, 1645 – 1651, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 3, folio 231.

72 Nugent, Nell M. Cavaliers and Pioneers: Abstracts of Virginia Land Patents and Grants 1623 – 1666, Vol. I. Maryland: Baltimore, Genealogical Publishing Co. Inc., 1979, pages 217 and 429, respectively.

73 Nugent, Nell M. Cavaliers and Pioneers: Abstracts of Virginia Land Patents and Grants 1623 – 1666, Vol. I, page 429, mentions Jonas Jackson and Edward Revell in their joint investment to acquire land through the transportation of twenty peoples to the New World.

Works Used

Monographs

Ames, Susie M. (Ed.). County Court Records of Accomack – Northampton, Virginia 1640 – 1645. Virginia: Charlottesville, The University of Virginia Press, 1940.

Evan, Barbara. A to Zax: A Comprehensive Dictionary for Genealogists & Historians. Virginia: Alexandria, Hearthside Press, 1995.

Fleet, Beverley. Virginia: Colonial Abstracts, Vol. I, Maryland: Baltimore, Genealogical Publishing Co. Inc., 1988.

Greer, George Cabell. Early Immigrants: 1623 – 1666. Maryland: Baltimore, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1982.

Houston, William R. M. M.D. & Mihalyka, Jean M. Colonial Residents of Virginia’s Eastern Shore: Whose Ages Were Proven Before Court Officials of Accomack and Northampton Counties. Maryland: Baltimore, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1985.

Mackey, Howard Dr., & Grooves, Alma Hinkley CG. (Eds). Northampton County Virginia Record Book: Orders, Deeds, Wills & r, 1645 - 1651, Vol. 3. Maine: Rockport, Picton Press, 2000.

Mackey, Howard Dr., & Grooves, Alma Hinkley CG. (Eds). Northampton County Virginia Record Book: Deeds, Wills & r, 1655 – 1657. Maine: Rockport, Picton Press, 2000.

Marshall, James Handley (Ed). Abstracts of the Wills and Administrations of Northampton County, Virginia: 1632 – 1802. Maine: Rockport, Picton Press, 1994.

Meyer, Virginia M. (1974 – 81) & Dorman, John Frederick F.A.S.G. (1981 – 87) (Revised and Edited). Adventures in Purse and Person Virginia 1607 -1624/25 3rd Edition. Virginia: Richmond, The Dietz Press Inc., 1987.

Nugent, Nell Marion. Cavaliers and Pioneers: Abstracts of Virginia Land Patents and Grants 1623 – 1666 Vol. I. Maryland: Baltimore, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1979.

Perry, James R. The Formation of a Society on Virginia’s Eastern Shore 1615 – 1655, North Carolina: Chapel Hill, University of North Carolina Press, 1990.

Walczyk, Frank V. (Ed.). Northampton County Virginia Record Book: Orders, Deeds & Wills, 1651 - 1654, Vol. 4. New York: Coram, Peter’s Row, 1998.

Whitelaw, Ralph T. Virginia’s Eastern Shore: A History of Northampton and Accomack Counties. Vol. I, Virginia: Richmond, Virginia Historical Society, 1951.

Primary Sources

Northampton County: Court Records 1632 – 1640 Orders, Wills, etc., Vol. 1. Clerk of the Court, Accomack – Northampton County Courthouse, Northampton, Virginia. Microfilm (NCR 1) Reel# 1, Edward H. Nabb Research Center for Delmarva History and Culture, Salisbury University, Salisbury, Maryland.

Northampton County: Court Records 1640 – 1645 Orders, Deeds, Wills, Vol. 2. Clerk of the Court, Northampton County Courthouse, Northampton, Virginia. Microfilm (NCR 2) Reel# 2, Edward H. Nabb Research Center for Delmarva History and Culture, Salisbury University, Salisbury, Maryland.

Northampton County: Court Records 1645 – 1651 Orders, Deeds, Wills, etc., Vol. 3. Clerk of the Court, Northampton County Courthouse, Northampton, Virginia. Microfilm (NCR 3) Reel# 3, Edward H. Nabb Research Center for Delmarva History and Culture, Salisbury University, Salisbury, Maryland.

Northampton County: Court Records 1651 – 1654 Orders, Deeds, Wills, etc., Vol. 4. Clerk of the Court, Northampton County Courthouse, Northampton, Virginia. Microfilm (NCR 3) Reel# 3, Edward H. Nabb Research Center for Delmarva History and Culture, Salisbury University, Salisbury, Maryland.

(The reference number located between parentheses is only applicable to the microfilm shelves of The Edward H. Nabb Research Center for Delmarva History and Culture.)


Appendix A

The Will of Alice Wilson (date unknown)
Northampton Court Records (1640 -- 1645) 2: f. 11, trans., James Edward Jensen, 2004.


Appendix B

The Inventory of John Jackson (Aug. 27th 1647)*
		
The true Inventory of John Jackson his estate		
prased & valued by us James Berry & Jno~		
Roberts upon oath(as followeth)~  ~   ~            tobacco	
Impris one cowe valued at	                      00400	
one heyffor of fourteene months old at	              00200	
one gunn	                                      00150	
one course faire suit of cloathes	              00200	
one younge sowe & 5 smale pigs	                      00120	
one pr of old shoes & stockins	                      00020	
one course Dutch hatt	                              00012	
one old sheirt	                                      00005	
one weedeinge hoe att	                              00020	
towe hundred salte Troutes att	                      00300	
one old follinge band att	                      00008	
one barrowe of sheats att	                      00050	
one knife & sheath	                              00006	
one barr" &  corne & some small parcls		
of fish laid into the house for pervison & a		
yard or 2 of Rybbinige		
These are prassed & vallued by us whose names		
are above written accordinge to the best of our		
judgmte witness the hands  James Berry		
Exhibeth in court & sworne }  Jno Roberts		
[the] xxxth August 1647/              signed/   ~ /		
Recordate tertio die mense September=		
Ano 1647       Per me Edm:  Mathewes Clir/		

* Northampton Court Records (1645 -- 1651) 3: f. 89 – p. 90, trans., James Edward Jensen, 2004.


Appendix C

The Account of Richard Leman (Sept. 4th 1647)*
		
          mris. Jane Leman widdowe & Admrstratrix of ye. ~	
          estate of Rich: Leman deced is Credditor to ye: ~	
          said estate by pticulrs due to herselfe to bee ~	
          satisfyed by ordr. In ye. First place & by sevrall ~	
          paymts. disbursed as followeth./	
	                                                 Li Tob
By one able man servant for Seven yeares att	          15000
by one oxe for ye. Funrall	                           0800
by one case of drams for ye. funrall	                   0200
by one coffin	                                           0100
by soe much pd for Tyth Corne	                           0060
by soe much pd W.m Carter for dressinge dinner

att ye. Funrall                                             100
by soe much pd mr. Jno: Stringr. Per ordr:	           1400
By soe much paid Capt Stone for Tythes, taxes and

Levyes                                                     1333
By soe much pd mr. Edm: Connawaye for fees	           0400
By so much pd Steph: ye. Coop for Caske for ye. Cropp	   0240
By soe much pd for Cowe keeps wags	                   0500
By soe much pd Jno. Parnell by ordr:	                   0250
By soe much pd Jno. Savage by ordr.	                   0400
By soe much pd mr. Tho: Bushrodd by ordr.	           0426
By soe much pd mr. Carleton by ordr.	                   0200
By soe much pd for makinge a grave	                   0040
By soe much pd to mr. Drew	                           0100
By soe much pd to mr. Obedienc. Robins by ordr.	           1072
By soe much pd Jno: Delonge by ordr.	                   1450
By soe much pd Jeffery Mensall beingen for servants

wags & 3. Barrlls of Corne                                 0125
By soe much pd mr. Anth: Hoskins per ordr.	           1350
By soe much pd Nick. Scott for servants wages

Towe Barrlls. &  of Corne                                 0125
By soe much pd Thomas Evans by ordr.	                   0162
By soe much pd Wm. Stephens by ordr.	                   0300
By Row: Vaughan his bill specifyed in ye. Inventorye

of ye. Estate not recd                                     0100
By Henry Handey his bill conteyned in ye. said Invenr
Li Tob
& not recd                                                 0076
By Samll. Powelle debt upon Accott conteyned in

ye. aforesd Inventorye not recd                            0126
By soe much for my paynes takeinge & others to

mannage ye. Bussines Concrninge ye. Estate                 1500
Jurate: in Curt. Vicesimo nono	
die mense Juny 1647./                  Jane Leman:/Suma   14260
Test me Edm: Mathews Clir Cur./	
By soe much pd to Jno: Charles by ordr:            0565	
          Recordatr quarto die mense Septem 1647	
          per me Edm: Mathews Clir Cur.	

* Northampton Court Records (1645 -- 1651) 3: p. 90 - f. 90, trans., James Edward Jensen, 2004.


Appendix D

The Inventory of Richard Lemans (Aug. 25th 1646)*
	
                         A true and perfect Inventory of ye. Estate of~	
                         Richard Lemans decd apprayzed upon~	
                         oath by Jno. Stringr. Wm Munns Jno:~	
                         Webster & ffrancis Petitt this XXVth of~	
                         August Ano 1646/	
Impris: 2 cowes; one yearlinge & bull calfe; and one
                                                           L Tob
steere of towe years old                                   01100
one other steere of 2 years old	                            0250
per ye Cropp of five men 5109L. tob: (where of thre	
shares to bee deducted restinge & due to ye. estate)	    0229
i old small table & frame, one old Trunke broken

one old Boxe                                               00080
one powderinge Tubb; one siftinge Tray att	           00040
3 milke bowles, & one wooden straynr.	                   00040
2 old gunns & one old muskitt att	                   00250
one old Lantherne wth.out a bottome. 1. washinge

Tubb, wth. all ye. hoops off                               00004
5 old wooden platers att	                           00070
1 old broad Axe, 5 Iron wedgs att	                   00070
2 Sawes & adze 2:	                                   00080
one payre of smale stillyards att	                   00040
one Iron bill one chappinge Knife	                   00005
2: old broken drawinge Knivs, one pre of broken

pinshers                                                   00005
2. Hatchette 3. tradeinge hoos att	                   00010
1. old Axe, 1. Chissell 7. old hoos att	                   00010
ffouteene smale Books att	                           00030
one smale Boate lost	                                   00000
one howse & Plantation for one yeare to owne	           00100
one steere of 3. yeares old (in ye. Hands of Capt Nathan

oldis)                                                     00350
Jno: Delonge for eight pr. of shoes

To sevrall Debts by bill & Accott amounteinge to ye.       08876
sume of                                             
            The Estate is Credr. 	                   13395
	                                                   03104
more per bill Jno. Charrll.                                 0215	
more per bill goodman Harloe                                0178	
more per bill ordr of Court  mris. Taylor                   0389	
                                                           14077	
            Wee (whose Names are here subscribed) have~~	
            appraysed ye. Above specifyed goods (accordinge	
            to our. Consciencess. ) and ye. best of our: Knowledge,	
            As witnes our. hands this xxv:th of August	
                                       1646	
               John Stringer      W:m Munns

               ffran: Pettitt        Jno: Webster 	
Recordat:r Quarto die mense Septembr 1647   	
               Teste me Edm: Mathews Clir Cur.	

* Northampton Court Records (1645 -- 1651) 3: f. 90 – p. 91, trans., James Edward Jensen, 2004.


Appendix E

The Bond of those Administering (Apr. 13th 1649)*

To All xpian people whome this wrightinge maye
any wayes concrne Knowe yee that wee George~
Clarke George Clarke & John Badham both of the
County of Northampton doe by these prsents bynd our
selves, our heyres. Exrs. Admrs. Or assignes. To delivr or
cause to bee delivred unto ye. Ovrseers of ye. Estate~
of mris: Jane Lemon deceased; for ye. use & benefitt 
of her Sonne & heyre Jonah Jackson, Twenty ~
ffive Cowes.wth. Calfe, or Calfes by their sides
The sd Cowes to bee delivred att ye. expiracon afs
Seaven yeares aftr.ye. Date hereof unto ye. sd ~
ovrseers their heyres, Exrs Admrs. or Assiggnes And ~
in Consideracon of this our Judgment. wee ye. sd. Geor.
Clarke & Jno. Badham doe acknowledge to have recd
of & from the sd ovrseers. Esq. Tardley, mr. Steph:
Charltone & Petr. Wlaker. ffive milked Cowes
towe heyffers; towe steaeres, towe yearling ~
heyffore. & ffoure Calfes (all of the stocke of ye. sd
mris. Jane Lemon) And if there shall bee any ~
more found belonginge to ye. sd Estate; Then wee
Geor. Clarke & Jno. Badham doe bynd our selves to
bee Accountable for them to ye. said ourseers for their
Assignes; And further wee bynd our. selves. Not to ~
dispose of any of the sd stocke of Chattell tell this
agreemt. Shalbe appved & Allowed of by ye. rest of ~
ye. ptyes intrusted wth the sd Estate; And doe ~
inioyne our. selves our. heyres. Exrs Admrs. or Asses
to delivr upp unto the sd ovrseers. all ye. sd stocke
of Chattles wth their Increase; Att the expiracon ~
of one yeare (if it shall by them bee requird) ~
And for ye. true performance wee have hereunto
sett our. hands & Seales this 13th daye of Aprill ~
1649./ 
Signed, Sealled & dd                   Georg. Clarke: ye Seals/
In the prssence of us.                 John Badham: ye. Seals/
Thomas Higby.
                              Recordatr. Tricesimo die mense
                              May Ano 1649 per me.
                                          Edm: Matheues Clic Cur./

* Northampton Court Records (1645 -- 1651) 3: p. 141, trans., James Edward Jensen, 2004.


Appendix F

The Inventory of Jane Lemman (Mar. 30th 1649)*
	
                         An Inventory of the Estate of mris:	
                         Jane Lemman deceased, Appraysed upon oath	
                         by mr. Anthony Hoskins, mr. Geor. Clarke,~	
                         Jonathan Giles & George Smyth upon ye. xxxth: 	
                         daye of March: Ano 1649 Sworne before Capt.	
                         Wm. Roper : = : = : = : = : = : = : = : = 	
Impris: one great Iron Kettle weighing 62L att 2L of tobaco
                                                     L tob: & Caske
& Caske per L                                                   124
Item one smale Iron Kettle & a smale Iron pott weigh: 42L
                             att 2L per L                       084
	                                                       L tb
Item one Iron pott weighinge 31L att one pound per L	        062
Item 3 payr of potthooks att	                                030
Item one fryinge pan, att	                                030
Item 3 Iron pestles att	                                        080
Item one smale spitt att	                                020
Item one pr of smale Hand Irons att	                        020
Item one Gun att	                                        050
Item one small gune fixt att	                                120
Item one frame of a Cowch att	                                025
Item one great Chayre & one smallr. Chayre att	                050
Item one table & frame att	                                100
Item one court cupboards att	                                080
Item one cutlase att	                                        020
Item one warmeringe pann att	                                030
Item one Looking glasse att	                                030
Item one old featherbedd; Boulster & greene rugg att	        500
Item one Cotton bedd weighinge 54L att	                        200
Item 3 old pillowe & towe Ruggs	                                030
Item one pr. of Curtaines & vallance Bedsted & matt	        160
Item one Trunndle Bed att	                                025
Item 3 old featherpillows	                                005
Item one old Churne att	                                        005
Item one Chaffinge dish att	                                005
Item one Trowell	                                        008
Item 4 Iron wedge and one Smale wedge att	                050
Item 2 Axes att	                                                050
Item one hand sword & one smale chapping knife & ye Ringes

 of a maule & sixe hainginge hookes                             025
Item one old featherbedds; 2 feather. pillows ; 2 Boulsters

of flaxe & a feathr. Bedsted & 2 matts                          400
Item 2 candlesticks of tyne; 2 tyne dripping panns, & 

one pudding pan, 2 Swace panns, & a Cullendr:                   050
Item one pye plate 6 great platt Trenchere 3 Smale plate 
2503
Trenchere; 6 deepe dishes, 5 great Sawcrs 3 Smale~  
Sawcrs weighinge 34L all good pewtr. att 14L Tob: per L	476
Item one old quart pott one Beker & 3 old dishes weigh:

10L all old pewter: att 8L tobac per L                          080
Item 2 candlesticks; 2 great Salts; one Little Salte, one Ewer

one drinkinge Bowle , one dram cupp & 2 Spoones~                070
Item one Smale brasse mortr & pestle	                        020
Item 2 Shagg wastcoats & petticoate att	                        170
Item one old Silke petticoate & wastcoate	                030
Item one Stew pan & covr.	                                035
Item one brasse Skimer	                                        020
Item 22 woodden Trenshers	                                030
Item one pr. of old brasse Skayles, I pr. of Taylors sheers

& one mrkeinge Iron                                             012
Item one Chest wthout Key	                                080
Item 20 Smale books	                                        150
Item Smyths Sermons & one other booke	                        050
Item one prcell of old Books	                                010
Item one table & frame	                                        050
Item one old Chest wthout a Key	                                030
Item one pound of powder	                                010
Item one great powderinge Table 	                        030
Item one Churne	                                                020
Item 3 milke Tubbs 1 Baskett	                                030
Item 2 great milke Bowles; 3 wooden platters; 2 hand

bowles one strayner & one Smale Cheese fatt                     090
Item 4 Trayes	
Item 18 gall of peach vinniger & Caske	                        090
Item one prcell of buttr att 2L per pound	                025
Item one pr of new holland sheets & 2 pillow beearers	        150
Item one pr of old sheets	                                040
Item pr of old sheets	                                        040
Item one Table cloath & 12 Napkins	                        070
Item 2 pr of old sheets & towe pillowe bearers	                060
Item one Apron & napkin	                                        010
                                      The Butter -- 025        1992
Item one prcell of Samples & Thread	                        120
It: one Smale fishinge = Lyne & 1L of twyne	                014
It: 6 yards of Silvr & gold Lace & one pr of gloves tops	060
Item towe Sowes, 2 barrows, 1 Boare & 6 shoats~	                400
It: one prcell of old Iron	                                010
It: one pr. Of Small Stillyards	                                040
It: 2 Sifteinge Trayes	                                        030
It: one Chest	                                                080
It: one old weedinge hoe	                                010
It: one Tennant Sawe, one Adze; one drawinge Knife	        030
It: one great woodden platr.	                                010
The mrk of Jonathan F Giles        Anth: Hodgkins

    Geoege: GS :Smyth his mrk   /   Geor. Clarke    L Tob: & Casks/
Item one great Sawe sould to Tho: Leatherbery	                192
Item Jonathan Gills one Earthen Jarr.	                        010
one Smale pott weighinge	
Item one great Boxe wth wrightinge	
It: one Book of Accottes	
It: one wrightinge Booke	
         Tobac. In a Chest                 112	
Recordatr. XXXeme die menss Maij Ano 1649	
             per me Edm: Mathews Clir Cur./	

* Northampton Court Records (1645 -- 1651) 3: p. 141-2, trans., James Edward Jensen, 2004.




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