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Biographical Profiles
John Holloway: an Eastern Shore Physician
By James Edward Jensen

Introduction
The adventurous lives of many individuals come to light while examining Virginia’s earliest court documents, specifically the stories of the first European inhabitants of Virginia’s Eastern Shore. Among these early settlers are individuals representative of every social station: from distinguished men to prominent wives, from farmers to craftsmen and from merchants to servants. However, the one professional often forgotten is the one who is most intrinsic to the well-being of a settlement in this frontier environment – the physician. While exploring primary sources dating to the first half of the seventeenth century, Virginia’s Eastern Shore was found to have been the home for four surgeons (known as chirurgions in colonial times): John Holloway, George Clarke, John Stringer and John Severne.[1] This biographical sketch will explore the life and legacy of the earliest known physician on the Eastern Shore of Virginia; namely John Holloway – a man once named among the eleven most prominent men of Accomack.[2]



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John Holloway
Beginning with John Holloway’s lengthy will, written on August 25, 1643, and entered into the court records on September 9, 1643, the reader is introduced to the doctor’s wife, his yet unborn child as well as numerous friends.[3] With only sixteen days between the aforementioned dates, it is likely that he suffered from an illness he knew he would not survive – an illness that left Holloway, in his own words, “very sicke and weake.”[4]

In total his will listed fifteen separate acts that he wished the overseers of his estate to execute.[5] First, he bequeathed his soul to God and requested a decent burial. Second, Holloway specified that his wife, Elizabeth Holloway, was to be his executrix and that she, along with his “young child with which she travelleth,”[6] were to share his plantation, goods and chattels equally. However, he also stipulated that if his child (under the guardianship of his wife) should die before it comes of age, then his child’s share is to be divided equally between Alexander Mountney, Jr., and Elizabeth Turner. Third, he wanted his child to have his “best Bible,”[7] providing his heir-to-be outlived his wife. Fourth, within the following eleven numbered entries, Holloway leaves the instructions for the distribution of particular lands, goods and chattels that he bequeathed to John Bedle,[8] Peter Lang,[9] Mr. James Barnabey,[10] John Tilney,[11] Mr. John Rosier,[12] Mr. Phillip Taylor,[13] John Fullard,[14] Anne Jones,[15] Gabriell Searld,[16] Mr. William Jones[17] and William Martin.[18] Finally, John Holloway’s will concludes by naming “Mr. Phillip Taylor, Mr. Alexander Mountney, Mr. William Jones and Mr. James Barnabe” as the overseers of his will, to each of whom he also bequeathed “one steere in recompence of their paines and care, desiring them to help and assist [his] said executrix.”[19]

Following his will is John Holloway’s account which lists Mr. James Barnabey,[20] Thomas Evans,[21] Dolby,[22] Millicent,[23] John Fullard[24] and John Savage[25] individuals to whom he owed debts. In addition, this document also mentioned that his personal book of accounts contained the details of all other debts owed either to him or by him.

A closer examination of both his will and account reveals much about John Holloway; specifically, that he had not only accumulated land and wealth, but that his social station as a physician allowed him to interact with numerous people. Furthermore, by examining the documents relevant to his arrival in the New World, as well as the head rights he claimed for the purpose of acquiring land, a clearer picture of the surgeon begins to emerge.

The earliest record of John Holloway is dated to April 29, 1635.[26] This document states that at the age of twenty-one, he was transported to New England, after embarking with nineteen others on the ship named the Elizabeth & Ann under the command of Master Roger Cooper. The next pertinent document mentions John Holloway, among seven others who were transported to Virginia’s Western Shore on the “last day of May, 1636”[27] as head rights belonging to Nathan Martin. Next, another important document is found. It indicates that twenty-six-year-old Elizabeth Holloway, his wife, embarked on the ship named The Safety on August 10, 1635 under the command of John Gruntur; she was leaving for England destined for Virginia.[28] Lastly, found in the early court records of Accomack – Northampton County on Virginia’s Eastern Shore, a crucial document is found dated to September 23, 1639. It states that a certificate was to be granted,

“unto John Holloway for the manifestation of his right in five hundred and fifties acres of land for the transport- ation of these persons…Impris John Holloway, William Cooke, Gabrill Henerlin, John Tilny, John Halsye, Richard Savage, Richard Clement, James Barmby, Sara Barmby, Henry Pace, John Wayworth.”[29]

From these four preceding references it becomes evident that John Holloway traveled several times before he finally settled on the Eastern Shore. First, he arrived in New England. Second, he moved to Virginia’s Henrico County on the Western Shore. Third, his wife, Elizabeth, who had probably remained in England for several months, finally rejoined her husband in Virginia. Fourth, that Holloway had arrived on the Eastern Shore prior to 1639, where he petitioned for his head rights to acquire his first tract of land in Accomack – Northampton County.

During the early colonial period, newcomers to Virginia would acquire land by either purchasing it directly from its proprietor or by paying for the transportation of other newcomers head rights – the latter of the two would require the payee to petition for the right to land based on the head rights they claimed. Since the latter applies to John Holloway’s first tract of land on Virginia’s Eastern Shore, it should be noted that the individuals claimed as head rights usually served as indentured servants to the payee for a period of seven years. This would account for the appearance of both John Tilney and James Barnaby within John Holloway’s head rights and will, since the two men were likely residing on Holloway’s land while in his service. However, not all indentured servants remained in the service of the same individual while completing their seven years of servitude. In a relevant case, John Holloway is ordered by the court to pay a debt owed to John Foster in the amount of “one thousand six hundred pounds of tobacco and two barrels of corne within ten dayes or els execution to be awarded upon one servant names John Neale and one boy Gabrill Searle, with two fether beds accordinge to a convanance made by Holloway dated the tenth of January 1637”.[30] From this document one may deduce that servants were interchangeable with furniture when calculating goods to repay a debt, displaying the ease with which humans could barter servants, trading them as chattel.[31] Entries in John Holloway’s will did not distinguish between servants and friends. In fact, one could assume that Holloway treated his servants as he would have treated his friends since most of the beneficiaries of John Holloway’s estate were possibly still in his service (at the time of his death) in order to repay him for their transportation. For example James Barnabey and John Tilney, servants and friends of the late John Holloway, were granted several items each as well as a servant each he use of land.[32]

Religion
No documentation for John Holloway’s particular religious affiliation has yet emerged. However, John Holloway did arrive in the New World via a ship bound for New England in 1635- an area known as a Puritan settlement. Puritans were a strong, community-oriented people who believed that regular Bible readings were essential to their spiritual life; and, therefore, invested a lot of time in reading. This in turn increased literacy rates in areas populated by Puritans. John Holloway’s will included a large number of books: a Bible, other religious works and medical texts in Latin. Holloway was obviously literate and enjoyed passing on his books to others.[33] He even bequeathed his Greek Testament to John Rozier, the rector of Hungars Parish, who was obviously his friend and literate too.[34] However, the most interesting information found concerning John Rozier referred to him as a “non-conformist and more acceptable to the Puritans, who comprised so large an element in the population of the peninsula at this time.”[35]

Within this frontier settlement the Sabbath day served two functions: first, to unite the community in religious worship; second, as the day public punishments where executed for individuals charged with crimes. Two such incidents involved John Holloway. In one court document Holloway is mentioned concerning an unknown complaint issued by Thomas Nute, with the result that Holloway was arrested and ordered “to lay neck and heels at the Church dore one the next Saboth day” and to stay in “Acchawmacke until the next Court.”[36] In another court document appeared the testimony of “Phillipp Chapman Churchwarden against John Holloway for committing fornication with Catherin Joanes.”[37] John was probably married at this time since his wife is believed to have arrived in Virginia by 1636, whereas the fornication charge took place in late 1638. However, even if he had committed adultery, it is not likely that he would have been severely punished since this frontier environment offered men an advantage within this gender-centric society. This two-tiered system of law can be seen in the sentencing each of the accused received. John Holloway was ordered to pay a fee of 200 pounds of tobacco and to acknowledge his fault in front of the whole community at church on the following Sunday, whereas Catherine Jones was subsequently ordered to receive thirty lashes upon her back.

John Holloway may have been the target of accusations because of his particular religious beliefs. Based on the evidence at hand, including the information acquired from the previously discussed secondary source, John Holloway may very well have been a Puritan. With the exception of Quakers, the early settlers of Virginia’s Eastern Shore would make references to their religious obedience and belief in God’s ways, but rarely, if ever, stated their personal denomination.

Credits and Debits
Within the court records for Accomack – Northampton County, John Holloway appears several times as having payments owed to him[38], as well as citing numerous debts[39] that he had incurred. From the documents listing payments which were due to John, a list of his clients begins to emerge. The most interesting cases cite court-ordered payments that reference specific amounts owed for specific medical services performed by the physician, such as healing wounds and treating ulcers. These cases also shed light on the type of duties performed by John Holloway within his Eastern Shore community. Likewise, from the documents that list John Holloway’s debts, one can see a clearer picture of the commercial network on the Easter Shore. For example- a monetary loan John Holloway gave to Mr. Stephen Charleton, the tobacco owed to Mr. Fushbrooke who resided on Virginia’s Western Shore, the bear meat Holloway owed to Luke Stubbing or the services Holloway purchased from Argell Yeardley Esquire, who was possibly a lawyer concerned with the export of goods to England, demonstrates the breadth of economic activity.[40]

Among Holloway’s numerous debts mentioned within the court records, one in particular, holds important information concerning his wife after his death. This aforementioned debt amounted to 650 pounds of tobacco that was to be paid to William Taylor, the attorney, for the executrix of John Bentley’s estate. This court-ordered payment stated, “John Nuthall whoe marryed the Relict and Executrix of the said Holloway shall satisfy and pay the said 650 pounds of tobacco.”[41] This provides information alluding to the new home Elizabeth Holloway made with John Nuthall and further serves as a microcosm for life on the early Eastern Shore of Virginia – a place where women were not plentiful and usually remarried if ever they were widowed.

John Holloway: Court Appearances
John Holloway appeared in court several times as did most of the early inhabitants of Virginia’s Eastern Shore; but his appearances were not always concerning charges[42] and executions[43] brought against him. Throughout the last three years of the eight that Holloway spent on the Eastern Shore, he appears as a member of the court’s jury,[44] a witness,[45] within a bond[46] as well as numerous depositions[47] and mentions.[48]

In addition, a very interesting court document cites perhaps the earliest malpractice suit in the New World- “it is ordered in consideration of John Holloways neglect in the cure of Thomas Wignall that the said Holowaye shall take Wignall home and kepe him according to his promise And use [and] to do his best indever in the cure of his legge.”[49]

Among more interesting court cases concerning John Holloway is one mentioning the education of a boy named Gabriell Searle. It Begins with the deposition of William Waters who states he “did heare Mr. John Holloway say that hee would keepe the boy Gabriell which hee bought of Mr. Holmes until hee had a month to serve and then hee…would instruct and shew him…his trade.”[50] Within the following documents, it is stated that “Holloway was to put in security forthwith to educate the sayde Gabriell in the Art of Chirurgery.”[51] With these words, on May 15, 1643 William Holmes, the plaintiff, accused John Holloway of a non-fulfillment of this aforementioned obligation. Next, Gabriell Searle offered his signed deposition stating, “that his Master Mr. John Holloway did never deny att any tyme to shew him the Art of Chirurgery.”[52] Subsequently, the court ordered that the boy should “serve the said Mr. Holloway until the Cropp of this present yeare bee fully finished.”[53] In addition to teaching others the art of surgery, John Holloway continually gained firsthand medical experience as seen in a court document which states, “that John Holloway had need to give [Captain Howe] 500 pounds of tobacco to gayne experience” by opening the body of Mr. Christopher Thomas.[54]

Land
As a practicing physician on the Eastern Shore, John Holloway would have had a limited clientele, therefore, leaving him with plenty of time to seek other opportunities to further his financial success. As previously noted, John Holloway had acquired land based on the head rights he claimed for the transportation of ten persons – a land tract located on the southside of the main branch of Hungars Creek, Accomack.[55] However, his land acquisitions did not end there. Holloway acquired another 1,300 acres of land on October 7, 1642, at Hungars Creek in Northampton County – this particular land tract beginning at Old Man’s Neck, which separated Holloway’s land from that of William Stone and William Jones.[56] In addition, during the winter of 1641, John Holloway had also sold[57] a portion of his lands prior to acquiring yet another parcel of land in Northampton.[58] Even after his death, John Holloway’s name appears concerning a petition that James Barnabey delivered to the court pertaining to 400 acres of land bequeathed to him by Peter Lang, who in turn received it from John Holloway over a decade earlier.[59]

Cattle and Other Livestock
As yet another avenue to acquire wealth, John Holloway actively participated in both the marking of cattle and the trade of livestock. In one court document, John Holloway was involved in a court dispute over the ownership of a cow calf he had marked for Thomas Smith. The case revolved around the fact that Holloway had marked the calf “by a mistake...[on] the contrary eare.”[60] Perhaps due this mistake people decided to go elsewhere for livestock marks as seen in a court document that cites the “home of John Holloway Chirurgion” as the location of a sale between William Johnson and Thomas Smith where the latter sold one barrow, one sow and one sow piglet. However, Johnson chose to “goe unto Robert Phillips his house and desire him come and marke the pigg in May.”[61]

John Holloway might have received additional payments for keeping other people’s animals on his land as seen in a court document concerning two depositions that mention John Holloway, then deceased, as having kept a cow calf for Roger Moye.[62] John Holloway is also mentioned as having promised one yearling heifer to John Knight, carpenter, perhaps for a service rendered; therefore, John Nuthall, the administrator of his estate, was ordered to make the said payment in accordance to John Holloway’s original agreement.[63] Because cattle were highly valued, their respective owners would want to keep their ownership on record; hence, John Holloway is mentioned in a court document nearly a decade after his death as having given Alice Robins a cow called “’Nutt,’ coloured black and white, also all her increase marked cropt on both ears.”[64] Within yet another court document, John Holloway is shown to have been involved in the cattle trade when, in his own handwritten account, he sold James Bruce two heifers with calves by their sides, which were two of the ten Holloway had bought from Lady Dales – “sold by the hands of Mr. Samuell Chaundler.”[65] Perhaps the most interesting court case involving John Holloway’s cattle trading was one within which he apparently owed James Perreen one heifer. The case began when William Hockaday appointed Randall Revell, as his attorney, to “demand and receive for [him] and [his] use one heifer which was due from John Holloway, deceased, unto James Pereen, deceased, and sold by the said Pereen unto [him]”[66]. Since William Hockaday was able to acquire the deposition of Elias Hartrit, who stated that “John Holloway, deceased, came unto James Perreen, deceased,” and bargained to trade one heifer and 15 shillings to satisfy the said Pereen who “was making a shute of cloathes” that Holloway wished to purchase.[67] Therefore, based on this deposition, Hockaday won his suit when John Nuthall was ordered to make the payment of one heifer “in whose custody the estate of John Holloway remayneth.”[68]

In the end, John Holloway was even faced with cattle trouble while writing his will. The existence of a cow calf on Alexander Mountney’s land is mentioned in a court document. This calf probably belonged to Holloway, but since he was incapacitated and unable to verify the validity of his claim, he decided not to will the said calf to Betty Mountney, Alexander’s daughter.[69]

John Holloway’s Passing
Within John Holloway’s lengthy inventory, taken on September 4, 1643, numerous items are listed. Within this list are found the following possessions: 43 clothing items, 3 canoes, 174 tools, 19 pieces of furniture, 56 articles of either bedding or other linens, 49 planks of cut lumber, 8 weapons with shot and powder, 36 books, surgical instruments and accessories, his plantation’s crop of corn and tobacco and livestock.[70] The latter, comprised of 40 head of cattle, 9 pigs, 12 geese, 11 chickens, 16 goats and 12 sheep, is suggestive of Holloway’s other interests aside from medicine, namely managing a farm and trading cattle. Therefore, from this extensive list of items that John Holloway was able to amass while on the Eastern Shore, his goods and chattels serve as an example of the potential wealth available to those willing to strive to better their financial situation. However, despite the fact that John Holloway was a successful physician, his land acquisitions and servants clearly generated more wealth for his estate then his bandaging and curing endeavors.

When John Holloway passed away he left a pregnant wife and many grieving friends, but his name lived on through his daughter, if only briefly. Before his posthumous daughter Priscilla came of age, a few court documents appeared which contained pertinent information regarding her father’s estate. First, William Jones, one of the overseers of the estate of John Holloway, requested that the estate be “sequestered and devided that the orphant of the said Holloway his estate may bee rightly knowne from the rest of the estate of the Relict;” further, that Mr. Stephen Charlton be “overseer of the said orphans estate,” with Mr. Palmer as “umpire.”[71] Second, both James Barnabey and John Nuthall submitted to the court their petition to receive their respective Quietus est concerning John Holloway’s estate.[72] Third, the court entered into the records that both James Barnabey and John Nuthall had been granted an official discharge thereby freeing them from any further responsibility concerning the aforementioned estate. [73]

Priscilla: John Holloway’s Only Child
The final chapter of Holloway’s legacy was filled with the interesting childhood of his only child--Priscilla. After her father’s death, her mother, Elizabeth, married John Nuthall. This left Priscilla to grow up in Nuthall’s home, never having met her father, but not without the rights to the land, goods and chattel he left to his heir. This fact can be seen in a court document which states that “Mr. [John] Nuthall father in lawe of Pricilla Hollowell…according to the voluntarye offer of the [said] Mr. [John] Nuthall…is thought fitt and ordered by the court that the [said] Prissilla Hollowell” shall continue with “Mr. Nuthall;” further, that John Nuthall shall deliver twenty cows, one bull and one ox unto “Prissilla Hollowell (when she attayne unto [the] age of ffifteene yeares or [the] daye of her marriage,” whichever came first.[74] However, the most interesting document found in the court records reveals Priscilla’s birthday. The document in question names Simon Foscutt, William Whittington and James Barnabey as being bound to deliver “twenty cowes…one steare & one Bull” to “Priscilla Hollowaye att or upon [the] 10th of Decembr,” which will take place in the year “one thousand sixe hundd fifty & eight.”[75] Since the previously discussed document mentioned that her fifteenth birthday marked the day she was to receive cattle owed to her from her father’s estate, her birthday must have been the December 10, 1643 – making her mother roughly six months into her pregnancy by the time her father, John Holloway, died.

Elizabeth, Priscilla’s mother, appeared in two court cases. One pertinent court case involving the defamation of Elizabeth’s character mentioned four interesting points.[76] First, Mr. Robert Andrews was “sorry for the offense offered by him to Elizabeth the wife of Mr. John Nuthall.” Second, Mr. John Nuthall “has presented to the commissions (as security for the estate of Prissilla Hollaway orphan) Rich. Smyth planter, Capt. Step Charlton and himself,” who did “forthwith enter into bond.” Third, Mr. John Nuthall “acquainted the court that he hath a purpose, this shipping to transport his wife with himself for England…and enlarge tertiary to the tenth.” Finally, the court ordered that a “certificate be granted unto the said Elizabeth Nuthall (unto whom it may continue in England or else where) to signify and demonstrate that the said Elizabeth the wife of John Nuthall is …cleared from…false scandal most unworthy cast upon her by the venomous accusations of Elizabeth the wife of Wm. Gaskins.” Thus, from this document one can see how important an individual’s reputation is, whether across the ocean in England or, especially, in such a tightly-knit community as the Eastern Shore.

Priscilla Holloway appears in only two other court documents. In the first she declares her wish to have James Barnabey take “into his possession [the] estate of Prissilla Hollaway and to dispose of it, according to her order provided she make it appeare under her hand [the] next court,” but nothing further arises from this matter.[77] The second record referencing Priscilla Holloway, however, is more sobering. Within the court records, the deposition of Ann, the wife of William Ward, which took place on July 27, 1653, states that, “about six weeks since a boy (now servant unto Mr. John Nuthall, called William Graye, the piper, was in an up room with Persilla Hollowaye orphant (at Mr. John Nuthall his house).”[78] Apparently Priscilla was discovered climbing down a ladder with blood on her “lining or shift” and that “the piper had lay with her.”[79] Nothing further appears in the court records concerning this rape case, although the most disturbing fact is that the young Priscilla would have only been nine-and-a-half years old.

The date of Priscilla’s marriage is unknown, but her nuptials must have taken place between 1658, when she was fifteen, and 1706, the year Abraham Jacob “escheated” 500 acres of land “from Priscilla Stephens, deceased.”[80] The most likely candidate to have married Priscilla Holloway would have been “William Stephens Boate-wright”[81] because he was the only Stephens unmarried at that time. Further, a secondary-source reference is found mentioning a “William Stephens” as having married Priscilla.[82]

 

John’s Family

(1) John Holloway [ -1643] = Elizabeth________= (2) John Nuthall |

(Posthumous child) Priscilla Holloway [1643 – ] = William Stephens





Footnotes:

1 For references which cite the aforementioned men as chirurgions, see the following. John Holloway, Order, 1645 – 1651, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia. Microfilm Reel# 3, folio 20, Edward H. Nabb Research Center for Delmarva History and Culture, Salisbury University, Salisbury, Maryland. Mr. George Clarke, Order, 1651 – 1654, Northampton County Courthouse, Northampton, Virginia. Microfilm Reel# 3, page 151, Edward H. Nabb Research center for Delmarva History and Culture, Salisbury University, Salisbury, Maryland. John Stringer, Order, 1645 – 1651, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 3, folio 19. John Severne, Order, 1645 – 1651, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia. Microfilm Reel# 3, page 30.




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2 John Holloway, Will, 1640 – 1645, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia. Microfilm Reel# 2, folios 218 to 219, Edward H. Nabb Research Center for Delmarva History and Culture, Salisbury University, Salisbury, Maryland, which contains a letter from William Shrimpton, of “Whitchurch in the county of Southampton, gentleman, surviving executor of the last Will and Testament of Dame Elizabeth Dale” the “Relict and Executrix of the Last Will and Testament of Sir Thomas Dale, Knight, her husband.” Within this letter the eleven most prominent men of Virginia’s Eastern Shore are listed, namely: “Argoll Yardley, Nathaniell Littleton, Obedience Robins, John Parramoore, James Perrin, John Stringar, Phillip Taylor, the Executors or Administrators of the said John Holloway, William Whitby (gentleman), Goodman Wyatt and the Executors or Administrators of the said William Burdett.”

3 John Holloway, Will, 1640 – 1645, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 2, folios 164 to 165.

4 John Holloway, Will, 1640 – 1645, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 2, folio 164.

5 Here it should be noted that John Holloway’s will listed fifteen acts that he wished for the overseers of his will to execute, but the document listed two separate and consecutive entries both as being the fourth; therefore, due to this error, the last eleven numbered entries are off by one, leaving the last numbered entry erroneously as number fourteen.

6 John Holloway, Will, 1640 – 1645, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 2, folio 164. This indicates that John Holloway’s wife, Elizabeth Holloway, was pregnant at the time his will was written. Therefore, since there were no apparent changes made to his will just prior to his death, one would assume that his child was born posthumously.

7 John Holloway, Will, 1640 – 1645, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 2, folio 164.

8 John Holloway, Will, 1640 – 1645, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 2, folio 164 and page 165, to whom he bequeathed two cows, the bed he sleeps on, a red waistcoat, a red pair of drawers, a hat, one young female goat, a crooked gun and one young male goat kid.

9 John Holloway, Will, 1640 – 1645, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 2, page 165, to whom he bequeathed a parcel of land he purchased from Richard Smith and Thomas Smith, one cow named Snow along with her bull calf, another cow and calf, one little flock bed bolster, a rug, one female goat with its kid, one breeding sow, one musket, one book on the Ephesians and a young bull: all to be delivered to Mr. James Barnabey and John Bedle, who are to be placed in charge of the youth and his education.

10 John Holloway, Will, 1640 – 1645, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 2, page 165, to whom he bequeathed his cloth suit lined with otter skin, one cap, one female goat and the benefit of Mr. Dowman’s work. Mr. Dowman was most likely a servant of John Holloway.

11 John Holloway, Will, 1640 – 1645, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 2, page 165, to whom he bequeathed all of his “phisick and chirurgery,” a chest of instruments and lancets (lancets were instruments used to cut into veins to bleed a sick patient, a practice known as phlebotomy), “all his phisicall and chirurgical bookes in Latin and English,” a small brass mortar and pestle, a cistern, and the use of a tract of one hundred acres of land near a bridge. Upon this aforementioned tract of land John Tilney is to construct a tenantable house, twenty-five feet long, which is to be given to “the lawful heirs” when they are of age. These heirs being his wife and child – or to pass to Alexander Mountney, Jr., and Elizabeth Turner, providing his child does not reach the age of fifteen.

12 John Holloway, Will, 1640 – 1645, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 2, page 165, to whom he bequeathed his Greek Testament. See subsection entitled Religion.

13 John Holloway, Will, 1640 – 1645, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 2, page 165, to whom he bequeathed his “ursins cattechisme,” which should be spelt Ursinus’ Catechisms – also known as the Heidelberg or Palatinate Catechism that was compiled by two German theologians, namely Caspar Olevianus and Dr. Zacharias Ursinus – first published in most European languages in 1563. The catechism method of instructing people in the teachings of Christianity taught the basic beliefs of Christianity through a series of questions and answers.

14 John Holloway, Will, 1640 – 1645, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 2, page 165, to whom he bequeathed his copy of a book entitled The Humiliation for Sin.

15 John Holloway, Will, 1640 – 1645, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 2, page 165, to whom he bequeathed an old female goat. It should be noted that John Holloway’s will refers to Anne Jones as the younger daughter of William Jones.

16 John Holloway, Will, 1640 – 1645, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 2, page 165, to whom he bequeathed one young female goat with its kid and one heifer with its calf. It should be noted that the cow and calf are stated as being kept on Francis Martin’s land.

17 John Holloway, Will, 1640 – 1645, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 2, page 165, to whom he bequeathed the remainder of his books.

18 John Holloway, Will, 1640 – 1645, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 2, page 165, to whom he bequeathed one female goat.

19 John Holloway, Will, 1640 – 1645, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 2, folio 165.

20 John Holloway, Account, 1640 – 1645, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 2, folio 165, to whom he owed three sows with piglets, one boar, twelve laying hens, a cock, one goose, one gander, one pair of sheets, one feather bed, one bolster, a rug, a four-gallon iron pot, a brass kettle, an iron pestle and one female turkey and her mate.

21 John Holloway, Account, 1640 – 1645, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 2, folio 165, to whom he owed one heifer and calf, which was to be paid in September.

22 John Holloway, Account, 1640 – 1645, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 2, folio 165, to whom he owed one cow with a calf, which was to be paid in March.

23 John Holloway, Account, 1640 – 1645, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 2, folio 165, to whom he owed wages valued at one cow, which was to be paid in March.

24 John Holloway, Account, 1640 – 1645, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 2, folio 165, to whom he owed one cow with a calf, which was to be paid at harvest time (the document stated “at the crop”).

25 John Holloway, Account, 1640 – 1645, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 2, folio 165, to whom he owed one weaning calf.

26 Tepper, Michael (Ed.). New World Immigrants: A Consolidation of Ship Passenger Lists and Associated Data From Periodical Literature, Vol. I. Maryland: Baltimore, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1980, page 44. The actual reference states, “Jo. Holloway, 21.”

27 Nugent, Nell M. Cavaliers and Pioneers: Abstracts of Virginia Land Patents and Grants 1623 – 1666, Vol. I. Maryland: Baltimore, Genealogical Publishing Co. Inc., 1979, page 41.

28 Hotten, John Camden (Ed.). The Original Lists of Persons of Quality; Emigrants etc., Who Went From Great Britain to the American Plantations: 1600 – 1700. Maryland: Baltimore, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1986, pages 121 – 123.

29 John Holloway, Order, 1632 – 1640, Accomack – Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia. Microfilm Reel# 1, page 190, Edward H. Nabb Research Center for Delmarva History and Culture, Salisbury University, Salisbury, Maryland. For further references see the following: John Holloway, Order, 1632 – 1640, Accomack – Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 1, page 199, which references 550 acres of land that was granted unto John Holloway, dated to November 7, 1639. Nugent, Nell M. Cavaliers and Pioneers: Abstracts of Virginia Land Patents and Grants 1623 – 1666, Vol. I, page 123, which also references John Holloway as owning 550 acres of land on the south side of the main branch of Hungars Creek in Accomack for the transportation of ten persons.

30 John Holloway, Order, 1632 – 1640, Accomack – Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 1, page 168. This entry was recorded on January 7, 1638/9, roughly a year after John Holloway originally made the arrangements for his payment of a debt to John Foster.

31 Perhaps this seemingly inhumane treatment of others was what facilitated the later wide-spread slave trade in the New World, since colonists were preconditioned to accept the fact that people could be property – despite their limited servitude. Although this topic remains too complex to discuss in a note, the point needs to be made clear: some people owned other people. For additional references to John Holloway having bought or sold servants, consult the following citations. John Holloway, Order, 1632 – 1640, Accomack – Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 1, page 104, which mentions a servant named Elizabeth Starkey, who after suffering the abuses of Alexander Mountney, was purchased by John Holloway since he already had “a halfe share in her.” John Holloway, Order, 1640 – 1645, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 2, folio 114, which mentions Holloway’s acquisition of Simon Foscott, a servant ordered to serve him for the term of “one whole yeare.” John Holloway, Order, 1640 – 1645, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 2, folio 92 and pages 93, 95 and 102. Within these four cited documents John Holloway’s sale of an indentured servant, Edward Monnck, is addressed in detail. A disagreement arises between John Holloway and Thomas Wyatt, the purchaser, concerning the validity of the sale, since the latter is faced with the obligation to provide the servant with clothes and corn at the end of his term.

32 See previous notes numbered 10 and 11 for a full description of what was bequeathed to them in John Holloway’s will.

33 Here it should be noted that John Holloway willed his best Bible to his then unborn child as the third act in his will; which would imply that he wanted his child to be literate, but also that he was genuinely concerned with all aspects of his religion.

34 For additional references concerning the interactions between John Rozier and John Holloway. see the following citations. William Roper, Order, 1640 – 1645, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 2, folio 194, which states, “at the house of Mr. John Rosier,” William Roper was told to “take the otter skinn out of [John Rozier’s] chest and give it unto Mr. Holloway.” William Jones, Order, 1645 – 1651, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 3, page 46, which states that William Jones, “being present at the house of John Holloway chirurgion,” deceased, saw that both Mr. John Rozier and Alexander Mountney were present while John Holloway was making his last will and testament.

35 Wise, Jennings Cropper. The Kingdome of Accawmacke or The Eastern Shore of Virginia in the Seventeenth Century. Virginia: Richmond, The Bell Book and Stationary Co., 1911, page 259. It should be noted that John Rozier became the rector of Hungars Parish after William Cotton's passing.

36 John Holloway, Order, 1632 – 1640, Accomack – Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 1, page 40.

37 John Holloway, Order, 1632 – 1640, Accomack – Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 1, page 160.

38 For references listing payments owed to John Holloway, see the following citations. Peter Nowell, Order, 1632 – 1640, Accomack – Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 1, page 58, referencing a court-ordered payment of 232 pounds of tobacco “for surgery,” which was to be paid by William Andrewes and Garrett Andrewes, the executors for Peter and Ealse Nowell. John Brooks, Order, 1632 – 1640, Accomack – Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 1, page 65, which references an order for John Brooks to pay “twenty five pounds of tobacco and all charges” for not appearing in court to answer the suit against him. Mr. Phillip Dodsworth, Order, 1632 – 1640, Accomack – Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 1, page 65, referencing that John Holloway “preferred a bill administering phisack unto Mr. Phillip [Dodsworth] and two of the Lady Dales servants and Mr. Throgmorton servants,” which was ordered to be paid as follows: Mr. Dodsworth shall pay 160 pounds of tobacco, Mr. Throgmorton is to pay 410 pounds of tobacco and a further 60 pounds to be paid by Mr. Dodsworth as he is in charge of the Lady Dales estate. John Little, Order, 1632 – 1640, Accomack – Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 1, page 74, which mentions 50 pounds of tobacco owed for “applying meanes to his wounds.” John Cooke, Order, 1632 – 1640, Accomack – Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 1, page 108, where the estate of John Cooke, deceased, is ordered to pay 155 pounds of tobacco; “due unto the said Holloway for the cure of a mayd servante.” John Vaughn and Richard Hudson, Order, 1632 – 1640, Accomack – Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 1, page 109, which references their debt of a half barrel of corn each. Captain William Stone, Order, 1632 – 1640, Accomack – Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 1, page 116, referencing a payment of 200 pounds of tobacco; due “out of John Hatnalls wages for the cure of an ulcer in his throate.” Captain Howes’ estate, Order, 1632 – 1640, Accomack – Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 1, page 130, showing a payment owed for “the service of Anthony Norden,” deceased, in the amount of 441 pounds of tobacco. John Dennis, Order, 1632 – 1640, Accomack – Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 1, page 147, which cites a payment owed for a bill in “Stephen Charltons hands,” amounting to 160 pounds of tobacco. David Winley, Order, 1632 – 1640, Accomack – Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 1, page 147, which mentions a payment of 220 pounds of tobacco to be paid “out of the estate of Mr. Christopher Thomas,” deceased. Robert Warren, Order, 1632 – 1640, Accomack – Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 1, page 147, which references an attachment for a payment owed from “the estate of James Cooke,” deceased, in the amount of 155 pounds of tobacco. Davy Windlie, Order, 1632 – 1640, Accomack – Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 1, page 166, which cites a former order amounting to 220 pounds of tobacco. Henry Armatradinge, Order, 1632 – 1640, Accomack – Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 1, page 166, which mentions a payment of 200 pounds of tobacco “due by specialte, within twentye dayes” to John Holloway. Mr. Stephen Challeton, Order, 1640 – 1645, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 2, folio 25, which discusses the payment of 525 pounds of tobacco, at a rate of 40 percent, which was lent to Mr. Challeton. Thomas Gaines, Order, 1640 – 1645, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 2, page 64, which states that in a letter from the Isle of Kent, a Richard Thompson had informed John Holloway of a shipment of one hogshead of tobacco that he sent Holloway via the said Gaines; Gaines stated, “that the sayd Thompson was intended to send one down, but forgot.”

39 For references listing the debts John Holloway incurred see the following citations. John Holloway, Order, 1632 – 1640, Accomack – Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 1, page 8, referencing a debt of 6 pounds of “merchantable Bearer” that John Nuthal, the administrator of the estate of John Holloway, owed to Captain Ralph Wormeley, the administrator of the estate of Luke Stubbinge. Here it should be noted that this two-sided page was obviously incorrectly placed, since it refers to John Holloway as “deceased” among neighbouring documents which precede his death by roughly two years. John Holloway, Order, 1632 – 1640, Accomack – Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 1, page 64, referencing a debt of 600 pounds owed to Mr. Fusbrooke “on the other side of the Baye.” John Holloway, Order, 1632 – 1640, Accomack – Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 1, page 121, referencing a debt of 400 pounds of tobacco and charges owed to Thomas Smith. John Holloway, Order, 1632 – 1640, Accomack – Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 1, page 122, referencing a debt of 114 pounds of tobacco and charges owed to William Jones. John Holloway, Order, 1632 – 1640, Accomack – Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 1, page 128, referencing a debt of 309 pounds of tobacco owed to Mr. John Neale. John Holloway, Order, 1632 – 1640, Accomack – Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 1, page 153, referencing a debt of 320 pounds of tobacco and charges owed to George Dawe. John Holloway, Order, 1632 – 1640, Accomack – Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 1, page 160, referencing a debt of 318 pounds of tobacco owed to Phillip Chapman. John Holloway, Order, 1632 – 1640, Accomack – Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 1, page 166, referencing a debt to be paid by both John Holloway and John Major, amounting to 2,027 pounds of tobacco, which was owed to Stephen Charlton. John Holloway, Order, 1632 – 1640, Accomack – Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 1, page 166, referencing a debt to be paid by both John Holloway and Alexander Mountney, amounting to 700 pounds of tobacco, which was owed to Stephen Charlton. John Holloway, Order, 1632 – 1640, Accomack – Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 1, page 171, which mentions an unknown amount owed to the court for “contempt of court.” He spoke illy of Mr. Andrews. John Holloway, Order, 1632 – 1640, Accomack – Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 1, page 172, referencing a debt of 125 pounds of tobacco, costs and charges owed to Richard Jacob. John Holloway, Order, 1632 – 1640, Accomack – Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 1, page 215, referencing a debt owed to James Perin for a coat and charges. John Holloway, Order, 1640 – 1645, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 2, folio 25, referencing a debt of 525 pounds of tobacco and a further 130 pounds of tobacco in connection with an agreement mentioned on that same page. John Holloway, Order, 1640 – 1645, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 2, folio 31, referencing a debt of 202 pounds of tobacco and charges owed to Elizabeth Bramont, widow. John Holloway, Order, 1640 – 1645, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 2, folio 32, referencing a debt of “2 barrells of good sound Indian Corne,” owed to Nathaniell Littleton. John Holloway, Order, 1640 – 1645, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 2, page 46, referencing a debt of 155 pounds of tobacco owed to Robert Warren. John Holloway, Order, 1640 – 1645, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 2, folio 80, referencing a debt of 337 pounds of tobacco, which was paid to “Mr. Richard Ingle, Master of the good ship called the Ellinor for the use of Argell Yeardley Esquire.” John Holloway, Order, 1640 – 1645, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 2, page 101, containing the deposition of Humphrey Edwards, which states that “a certayne quantity of tobacco” was paid to William Holmes, “but what quantity it was…not certainly remembered.” After the payment was made, the said Holmes never sent John Holloway a bill. John Holloway, Order, 1640 – 1645, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 2, page 104, referencing a debt of 30 pounds of tobacco, which was charged for “swearing a blasphemous Oath;” although the specific oath in question is unnamed. John Holloway, Order, 1640 – 1645, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 2, folio 107, referencing a debt of “sixe barrels of good Indian Corne,” owed to William Worlige. John Holloway, Order, 1640 – 1645, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 2, folio 193, referencing a debt of 3 pounds and 2 shillings sterling owed to John Rosier for “Marriage and Funerall Rights” and 691 pounds of tobacco “due by specialtye.” John Holloway, Order, 1640 – 1645, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 2, page 211, referencing a debt of 1,600 pounds of tobacco owed to Edwyn Conaway for “Clarke fees.” John Holloway, Order, 1640 – 1645, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 2, folio 214 and page 215, referencing a debt of 650 pounds of tobacco owed to John Bentley, deceased.

40 See previous footnote for the respective page references.

41 John Nuthall, Order, 1640 – 1645, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 2, folio 214 and page 215.

42 John Holloway, Order, 1640 – 1645, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 2, folio 30, referencing charges brought against John Holloway for his failure to return a Bible he borrowed from Andrew Jacob. Holloway is subsequently ordered to return the book along with court fees.

43 John Holloway, Order, 1632 – 1640, Accomack – Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 1, page 96, referencing an execution against John Holloway to appear in court, issued by Richard Thompson attorney. John Holloway, Order, 1632 – 1640, Accomack – Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 1, page 125, referencing an execution against John Holloway for his unpaid debt of 400 pounds of tobacco owed to Thomas Smith.

44 John Holloway, Order, 1640 – 1645, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 2, page 117 and folios 117 to 118, where John Holloway appears in court as a member of the court’s general witnessing body and jury.

45 John Holloway, Order, 1640 – 1645, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 2, folio 54, which lists John Holloway as the witness to a bond between Mark Hammon and John Severne. John Holloway, Order, 1645 – 1651, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 3, folio 11, referencing John as a witness on February 2, 1641, but only recorded in the records in July 1645.

46 John Holloway, Order, 1640 – 1645, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 2, folio 86, referencing a bond between John Holloway and both John Charles and his wife Zarah, which precedes a list of the goods the latter two delivered to John Holloway as collateral for the bond in question.

47 John Holloway, Order, 1632 – 1640, Accomack – Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 1, page 34, referencing a deposition offered by both John Holloway and William Baseley, who stated that Joane Butler did call Edward Drew’s wife “a common carted hoare.” John Holloway, Order, 1632 – 1640, Accomack – Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 1, page 137, referencing a deposition concerning a debt of 100 pounds of tobacco owed to John Holloway by Captain Howe for “phisick administered.” John Holloway, Order, 1632 – 1640, Accomack – Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 1, page 140-141, referencing a deposition John Holloway made stating “Thomas Joyners store was burnt on a Monday” and that both John Bedle and John Neale were in his service at the time. It should be noted that these two servants were accused of the theft of items from the store in question. George Hall, Order, 1632 – 1640, Accomack – Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 1, page 149, referencing a deposition that mentions John Holloway as having taken six bags of corn by canoe to James Bruse’s house. John Holloway, Order, 1632 – 1640, Accomack – Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 1, page 168, referencing a deposition. Oddly enough the document itself is not on the page and is missing. John Holloway, Order, 1632 – 1640, Accomack – Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 1, page 197, referencing a deposition that names the estate of Nicholas Harwood as being indebted to John Holloway in the amount of 500 pounds of tobacco. John Holloway, Order, 1640 – 1645, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 2, page 64, referencing his signed deposition concerning a debt owed to him by Thomas Gaines amounting to one hogshead of tobacco.

48 John Holloway, Order, 1632 – 1640, Accomack – Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 1, page 21, which references a petition John Holloway made for an unknown tract of land. Here it should be noted that the page is damaged, in a poor state and probably no longer in its proper sequential order. Most of these early documents were kept as loose papers, and the remaining documents on the pages immediately preceding and following this entry date to the early 1630s when John Holloway was not even on the Eastern Shore. John Holloway, Order, 1632 – 1640, Accomack – Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 1, page 151, a document, which in passing references “John Hollowayes house,” and is concerning John Neale and in a run-away servant. John Holloway, Order, 1640 – 1645, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 2, page 70, containing a document that makes a reference to the testimony John Holloway gave concerning a bill he, along with Anthony Hodgkins, paid regarding Thomas Stanton. John Holloway, Order, 1640 – 1645, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 2, folio 71, referencing a court order that John Holloway “at the next Monthly court in Ackowmak produce an Accomp [account] upon Oath what goodes hee hath received this present yeare” from Thomas Stanton. John Holloway, Order, 1640 – 1645, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 2, folio 81, which contains an account that lists “item 02 galls of Tarr for John Holloway” valued at 10 shillings. Perhaps this “tarr” was used in the treatment of illnesses or perhaps to paint the bottom of his canoes (Within John Holloway’s inventory, found on page 182 to folio 183 of this same microfilm reel, is an entry that lists three canoes). See subsection entitled John Holloway’s Passing. Richard Beaman, Inventory, 1640 – 1645, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 2, page 95 and folio 95, which includes the entry, “item to John Holloway a hatt…042 [its value in pounds of tobacco].” Richard Beaman, Inventory, 1640 – 1645, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 2, folio 112, which oddly enough, references the same inventory with a nearly identical entry, which states, “item to John Holloway a hatt…082 [its value in pounds of tobacco].” Perhaps this variation in the hat’s value is due to a clerical error. John Holloway, Order, 1645 – 1651, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 3, folio 76, referencing John as being ordered to provide the court with a list of the goods he received from John Stanton, dated to September 12, 1641, and recorded on April 5, 1647,. Here it should be noted that the list itself was recorded in the court records covering the years 1640 – 1645 on folio 71.

49 John Holloway, Order, 1632 – 1640, Accomack – Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 1, page 166, dated to January 7, 1638/9.

50 William Waters, Order, 1640 – 1645, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 2, folio 145.

51 John Holloway, Order, 1640 – 1645, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 2, folio 147 and page 148.

52 Gabriell Searle, Order, 1640 – 1645, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 2, page 148.

53 John Holloway, Order, 1640 – 1645, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 2, page 148.

54 John Wignall, Order, 1632 – 1640, Accomack – Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 1, page 161, referencing his deposition that named John Holloway as indebted to Captain Howe for a post-mortem autopsy Holloway performed on the late Mr. Christopher Thomas.

55 Nugent, Nell M. Cavaliers and Pioneers: Abstracts of Virginia Land Patents and Grants 1623 – 1666, Vol. I, page 123.

56 Nugent, Nell M. Cavaliers and Pioneers: Abstracts of Virginia Land Patents and Grants 1623 – 1666, Vol. I, page 135.

57 John Holloway, Order, 1640 – 1645, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 2, folio 62, referencing an order for John to “procure a Lease for certain Land sould by him unto Thomas Bell.”

58 John Holloway, Order, 1640 – 1645, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 2, folio 77 and page 78, which cites Richard Smith as assigning a patent over to John Holloway and dated to February 26, 1641/2.

59 James Barnabey, Order, 1657 – 1664, Northampton County Courthouse, Northampton, Virginia. Microfilm Reel# 46, page 193 and folio 193. Edward H. Nabb Research Center for Delmarva History and Culture, Salisbury University, Salisbury, Maryland.

60 John Holloway, Order, 1640 – 1645, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 2, folio 97 and 105, within which John Holloway offers a deposition and an oath, respectively, concerning a cow calf that he had marked for Thomas Smith.

61 Martin Kenneet, Order, 1640 – 1645, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 2, folio 106. For another similar citation, see Henry Armitringe, Order, 1654 – 1655, Northampton County Courthouse, Northampton, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 4, page 3, which mentions that James Barnabey being at the house of John Holloway, deceased, asked Henry Armitringe to help him alter the livestock marks on about a dozen barrows.

62 John Holloway, Order, 1640 – 1645, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 2, page 173 and folio 174, referencing two depositions which mention John Holloway, deceased, as having kept a cow calf for Roger Moye.

63 John Nuthall, Order, 1645 – 1651, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 3, folio 20.

64 Alice Robins, Order, 1651 – 1654, Northampton County Courthouse, Northampton, Virginia. Microfilm Reel# 3, page 174, Edward H. Nabb Research Center for Delmarva History and Culture, Salisbury University, Salisbury, Maryland.

65 John Holloway, Order, 1640 – 1645, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 2, page 212. Here it should be noted that the letter was written and signed by John Holloway, dated to March 12, 1641, yet only recorded in late 1644 (at least prior to January 7, 1644/5, since the following court session, recorded on the same page, took place on that date).

66 William Hockaday, Order, 1640 – 1645, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 2, page 231.

67 Elias Hartrit, Order, 1640 – 1645, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 2, folio 235.

68 John Nuthall, Order, 1640 – 1645, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 2, page 236.

69 William Jones, Order, 1645 – 1651, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 3, page 76.

70 John Holloway, Inventory, 1640 – 1645, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 2, page 182 to folio 183.

71 William Jones, Order, 1645 – 1651, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 3, page 27.

72 James Barnabey and John Nuthall, Order, 1645 – 1651, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 3, folio 135. Here it should be noted that the legal term Quietus est refers to an official discharge of an individual’s account, thereby releasing the administrator(s) from any further responsibility.

73 James Barnabey and John Nuthall, Order, 1645 – 1651, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 3, page 146.

74 John Nuthall, Order, 1645 – 1651, Northampton County Courthouse, Northampton, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 3, page 190 and folio 190.

75 Priscilla Holloway, Order, 1654 – 1655, Northampton County Courthouse, Northampton, Virginia. Microfilm Reel# 4, page 84, Edward H. Nabb Research Center for Delmarva History and Culture, Salisbury University, Salisbury, Maryland. For the actual transaction entered into the records as being fulfilled, see Priscilla Holloway, Order, 1657 – 1664, Northampton County Courthouse, Northampton, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 46, folio 37.

76 Elizabeth Nuthall, Order, 1651 – 1654, Northampton County Courthouse, Northampton, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 3, page 46.

77 Priscilla Holloway, Order, 1657 – 1664, Northampton County Courthouse, Northampton, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 46, folio 49.

78 Ann Ward, Order, 1651 – 1654, Northampton County Courthouse, Northampton, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 3, folio 181.

79 Ann Ward, Order, 1651 – 1654, Northampton County Courthouse, Northampton, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 3, folio 181. A “lining or shift” refers to an undergarment – a light-weight negligee.

80 Nugent, Nell M. Cavaliers and Pioneers: Abstracts of Virginia Land Patents and Grants 1695 – 1732, Vol. III. Maryland: Baltimore, Genealogical Publishing Co. Inc., 1979, page 299. It should be noted that on page 39 a reference is also found concerning land Abraham and Thomas Jacob had “escheated from John Holloway, deceased, by inquisition under John Custis, junior,” in 1691.

81 William Stephens, Order, 1640 – 1645, Northampton County Courthouse, Virginia, microfilm Reel# 2, page 234.

82 Whitelaw, Ralph T. Virginia’s Eastern Shore: A History of Northampton and Accomack Counties. Virginia: Richmond, Virginia Historical Society, 1951, Vol. I: 352. In addition, on page 354 Whitelaw suggests that he may have been the same William Stephens that later settled in a “Rehoboth Plantation, in Somerset County,” Maryland, where he moved prior to 1669.

 

Works Used

Monographs

Ames, Susie M. (Ed.). County Court Records of Accomack – Northampton, Virginia 1640 – 1645. Virginia: Charlottesville, The University of Virginia Press, 1940.

Greer, George Cabell. Early Immigrants: 1623 – 1666. Maryland: Baltimore, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1982.

Hotten, John Camden. (Ed.). The Original Lists of Persons of Quality; Emigrants etc. Who Went From Great Britain to the American Plantations: 1600 – 1700. Maryland: Baltimore, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1986.

Mackey, Howard Dr., & Grooves, Alma Hinkley CG. (Eds). Northampton County Virginia Record Book: Orders, Deeds, Wills & r, 1645 - 1651, Vol. 3. Maine: Rockport, Picton Press, 2000.

Mackey, Howard Dr., & Grooves, Alma Hinkley CG. (Eds). Northampton County Virginia Record Book: Deeds, Wills & r, 1655 – 1657. Maine: Rockport, Picton Press, 2000.

Marshall, James Handley (Ed). Abstracts of the Wills and Administrations of Northampton County, Virginia: 1632 – 1802. Maine: Rockport, Picton Press, 1994.

Meyer, Virginia M. (1974 – 81) & Dorman, John Frederick F.A.S.G. (1981 – 87) (Revised and Edited). Adventures in Purse and Person Virginia 1607 -1624/25 3rd Edition. Virginia: Richmond, The Dietz Press Inc., 1987.

Nugent, Nell Marion. Cavaliers and Pioneers: Abstracts of Virginia Land Patents and Grants 1623 – 1666, Vol. I. Maryland: Baltimore, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1979.

Nugent, Nell Marion. Cavaliers and Pioneers: Abstracts of Virginia Land Patents and Grants 1695 – 1732, Vol. III. Maryland: Baltimore, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1979.

Skordas, Gust. The Early Settlers of Maryland, Maryland: Baltimore, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1979.

Tepper, Michael. (Ed.). New World Immigrants: A Consolidation of Ship Passenger Lists and Associated Data from Periodical Literature Vol. I. Maryland: Baltimore, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1980.

Walczyk, Frank V. (Ed.). Northampton County Virginia Record Book: Orders, Deeds & Wills, 1651 - 1654, Vol. 4. New York: Coram, Peter’s Row, 1998.

Whitelaw, Ralph T. Virginia’s Eastern Shore: A History of Northampton and Accomack Counties. Vol. I, Virginia: Richmond, Virginia Historical Society, 1951.

Wise, Jennings Crooper. The Kingdome of Accawmacke or The Eastern Shore of Virginia in the Seventeenth Century. Virginia: Richmond, The Bell and Stationary Co., 1911.

Primary Sources

Northampton County: Court Records 1640 – 1645 Orders, Deeds, Wills, Vol. 2. Clerk of the Court, Northampton County Courthouse, Northampton, Virginia. Microfilm (NCR 2) Reel# 2, Edward H. Nabb Research Center for Delmarva History and Culture, Salisbury University, Salisbury, Maryland.

Northampton County: Court Records 1645 – 1651 Orders, Deeds, Wills, etc., Vol. 3. Clerk of the Court, Northampton County Courthouse, Northampton, Virginia. Microfilm (NCR 3) Reel# 3, Edward H. Nabb Research Center for Delmarva History and Culture, Salisbury University, Salisbury, Maryland.

Northampton County: Court Records 1651 – 1654 Orders, Deeds, Wills, etc., Vol. 4. Clerk of the Court, Northampton County Courthouse, Northampton, Virginia. Microfilm (NCR 3) Reel# 3, Edward H. Nabb Research Center for Delmarva History and Culture, Salisbury University, Salisbury, Maryland.

Northampton County: Court Records 1654 – 1655 Orders, Deeds, Wills, etc., Vol. 5. Clerk of the Court, Northampton County Courthouse, Northampton, Virginia. Microfilm (NCR 4) Reel# 4, Edward H. Nabb Research Center for Delmarva History and Culture, Salisbury University, Salisbury, Maryland.

Northampton County: Court Records 1655 – 1657 Orders, Deeds, Wills, etc., Vol. 6. Clerk of the Court, Northampton County Courthouse, Northampton, Virginia. Microfilm (NCO 1) Reel# 45, Edward H. Nabb Research Center for Delmarva History and Culture, Salisbury University, Salisbury, Maryland.

Northampton County: Court Records 1655 – 1657 Orders, Deeds, Wills, etc., Vol. 7. Clerk of the Court, Northampton County Courthouse, Northampton, Virginia. Microfilm (NCR 5) Reel# 5, Edward H. Nabb Research Center for Delmarva History and Culture, Salisbury University, Salisbury, Maryland.

Northampton County: Court Records 1657 – 1664 Orders, Deeds, Wills, etc., Vol. 8. Clerk of the Court, Northampton County Courthouse, Northampton, Virginia. Microfilm (NCO 2) Reel# 46, Edward H. Nabb Research Center for Delmarva History and Culture, Salisbury University, Salisbury, Maryland.




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